Pleistocene

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Pleistocene

of, denoting, or formed in the first epoch of the Quaternary period, which lasted for about 1 600 000 years. It was characterized by extensive glaciations of the N hemisphere and the evolutionary development of humans

Pleistocene

 

the first division, corresponding to the longest epoch, of the Anthropogenic (Quaternary) period. The Pleistocene is characterized by a general cooling of the earth’s climate and periodic occurrence of extensive continental glaciation in the middle latitudes. Some researchers, including the Soviet geologist V. I. Gromov, classify the beginning of the Pleistocene as a separate epoch preceding the Pleistocene proper. This separate epoch, called the Eopleistocene, includes the Upper (Late) Pliocene, which is classified by most researchers in the Neogene.

The term “Pleistocene” was proposed in 1832 by the British geologist C. Lyell for the marine deposits immediately preceding deposits of the modern period because of the predominance of presently existing forms of fauna in these deposits.

Pleistocene

[′plī·stə‚sēn]
(geology)
The older of the two epochs of the Quaternary Period, spanning about 1.8 million to 10,000 years ago. It represents the interval of geological time (and rocks accumulated during that time) extending from the end of the Pliocene Epoch (and the end of Tertiary Period) to the start of the Holocene Epoch. It is commonly characterized as an epoch when the earth entered its most recent phase of widespread glaciation. Also known as Ice Age; Oiluvium.
References in periodicals archive ?
sapiens teeth, including remains of predatory cats, have previously been dated at other sites to no more than around 120,000 years ago.
If sea levels only 120,000 years ago were about the same as they are now, then the global ratio of ice-to-water was probably similar to what it is today.
The researchers found that approximately 120,000 years ago, the sea came close to drying up entirely, with another period of extreme dryness taking place about 13,000 years ago.
It is known that some 120,000 years ago - a mere tremor in the eyelid of time - the mean temperature of the world was five degrees warmer than it is now.
Instead of stable sea levels, the researchers estimated that the sea level oscillated up and down by 4 to 6 metres (13 to 20 feet) over a few thousand years, approximately 120,000 years ago during a period of time known as the Last Interglacial.
Because this warm period happened relatively recently, about 120,000 years ago, scientists could independently determine its sea level.
This way, we were able to estimate that the crossing of the Andes occurred more than 120,000 years ago," she added.
The Australian rains were strongest during the last warm interglacial period, about 120,000 years ago.
In modern humans starting 120,000 years ago, compassion was extended to strangers, animals, objects and abstract concepts.
According to the new study, the last interglacial began sometime before 127,000 years ago and ended 120,000 years ago, the scientists report in the Sept.
The two researchers suggest that a greenhouse warming may bring the same sort of conditions that stimulated the growth of glacial sheets 120,000 years ago.
In 2007, Frohlich studied these boulders, which have dimensions as large as 9 meters and weigh up to 1600 tons, and concluded that the boulders originated at the shoreline about 120,000 years ago and have since been displaced by a prehistoric tsunami.