short-form writing

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short-form writing

The limits imposed on the length of a single text message (160 characters) or a tweet (140 characters). It also refers to brief posts on Facebook and blogs. See SMS and Twitter.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, with an average of 160 characters to get your point across, it seems this method can be unsatisfactory--41 per cent of the women questioned admitted they had refused a second date based on an unsuitable text message, compared to only 25 per cent of men--this is despite the fact that more than half of the participants admitted to taking 15 minutes to compose the perfect text message.
Skinny Text your instant reaction to events to RPCOM followed by a space and your comments in less than 160 characters to 84080 (RoI 53305).
Messages can be up to 160 characters and cost 25p plus your standard network charge.
The message will be a maximum of 160 characters long including the key word.
In a standard English SMS you can use 160 characters per message.
The system has a memory capacity of more than 99 pages, each with 8 lines and 160 characters of information, allowing it to communicate multiple messages in a short time.
But since texting is limited to sending short bursts of 140 to 160 characters at a time, a creative language is developing that uses abbreviations, acronyms and symbols to pack as much information as possible into each transmission.
Passengers will be able to send a message of up to 160 characters via their personal in-seat monitor screens and handsets.
Short Message Service (SMS): An application enabling a mobile endpoint to send or receive messages of up to 160 characters in Roman text.
Graham Smith Text your instant reaction to events to RPCOM followed by a space and your comments in less than 160 characters to 84080 (RoI 53305).
Messages can be up to 160 characters long and cost 25p plus your standard network charge.
The O2 50 to Watch in Mobile were selected from a list of over 200 companies by an independent panel of experts including: Mike Short VP Research & Development - O2 Group Technology, Professor Peter Cochrane, Adam Leyland, Editor - Real Business, and Mike Grenville, Editor - 160 Characters.