Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the haste of today's busy medical practices, we are concerned that huge numbers of men who could benefit enormously from 5-alpha reductase inhibitors will not be prescribed them.
The 5-alpha reductase inhibitors are known to lower a person's level of dihydrotestosterone, which can contribute to prostate cancer growth.
alpha-blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, or antimuscarinics) depending on the initial assessment.
0 ng/mL or higher or a family history, African-Americans, or men taking 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (Proscar, Propecia, and Avodart).
Second, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ruled against the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (ARIs) for prostate cancer prevention, largely due to concerns about an increase in high-grade cancer.
Early use of drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may reduce the risk of clinical progression in men taking an alpha-blocker medication for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate), suggests a study in the August issue of Pharmacy & Therapeutics.
This is where cytoreduction comes in; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), antiandrogens + 5-ARIs or LHRHa can provide 17, 31 and 40% volume reductions with variable degrees of libido loss, fatigue and hot flashes.
For men with demonstrable prostate enlargement and higher PSA levels, drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may be prescribed.
Dutasteride and finasteride belong to a class of medications known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), used to shrink the prostates of men with benign prostate enlargement.
Both drugs belong to a class of medications known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, commonly used to treat benign prostate enlargement.
Drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate), do not increase men's risk of hip fracture, according to a study in the Oct.

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