8-bit computing

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8-bit computing

CPUs that process 8 bits as a single unit. The first personal computers in the late 1970s, such as the Apple II, Radio Shack TRS-80 and various Z80-based CP/M computers, all used 8-bit CPUs. Personal computers migrated to 16 bits when IBM selected the Intel 8088 CPU for the PC and later to 32 bits with the Intel 386. Today, low-cost 8-bit processors are made by the millions and embedded in myriad devices. See 8088, 386, 16-bit computing and bit specifications.

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Both also support 12 bits per RGBA component (versus 8 bits found in other workstations), thereby capable of displaying 68 billion colors (versus the typical workstation, which can display 16 million colors).
Other peripheral features include: up to 66 I/O pins with individual direction control; four pins that can be configured as capture input (120 nS resolution); three pins can be configured as PWM output (1-10 bits resolution with 130 KHz at 8 bits and 32 KHz at 10 bits); local communications capability for peripheral expansion (I2C(TM)/SPI(TM) compatible); and four timers (two 8 bit and two 16 bit).
Other peripheral features include: up to 50 I/O pins with individual direction control; four pins that can be configured as capture input (120 nS resolution); three pins can be configured as PWM output (1-10 bits resolution with 130 KHz at 8 bits and 32 KHz at 10 bits); local communications capability for peripheral expansion (I2C(TM)/SPI(TM) compatible); and four timers (two 8 bit and two 16 bit).