486

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486

486

The fourth generation of the Intel x86 family of CPU chips. The term may refer to the chip or to a PC that used it. Introduced in 1989, it was the successor to the 386 and the first chip in the line to include a built-in math coprocessor. Providing acceptable performance for DOS, it was bare minimum for Windows. Later versions of the chip doubled and tripled internal speeds (see DX2 and DX4). See OverDrive CPU, PC and x86.

Technical Specs
Type: 32-bit multitasking microprocessor
Transistors: 1,100,000 to 1,200,000 (1.0 micron)
Package: 168 or 169-pin PGA
Registers: 32 32-bit
Real Mode: Performs as a 16-bit 8086 CPU; addresses 1MB memory.
Protected Mode: Addresses 4GB physical and 64TB virtual memory; provides access to memory protection and 32-bit instructions.
Virtual 8086 Mode: Protected Mode subset that runs a Real Mode application in a virtual machine.

References in periodicals archive ?
0 SP3 or above, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP Home and Professional, 6 MB disk space, 4 MB free memory, Intel(R) 80486DX 66MHz or higher processor.
Age Number of years since the microprocessor chip series was introduced (for example, in 1993 the age of an 80486DX chip, which was introduced in 1989, was 4)
Personally, I prefer Quake's look, which is rendered using the math co-processor found in Intel's Pentium and 80486DX chips.
The same goes for the 80486DX as opposed to an 80486SX machine.
51, a 80486DX IBM-compatible PC with at least 8MB of RAM (16 recommended), at least 8MB of free hard disk space, a pointing device and a VGA monitor.
Personal Tax Edge CD-ROM requires an 80486DX processor at 25MHz, 4MB RAM, 12MB hard drive space and an MPC-compatible CD-ROM drive.
The Macintosh Quadra 660AV was priced like the top of the line 33 MHz 80486DX models from the major PC brands, but includes the extra Macintosh features listed above plus video capture and output, telecommunications, speech and Ethernet as standard.