a

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A,

first letter of the alphabetalphabet
[Gr. alpha-beta, like Eng. ABC], system of writing, theoretically having a one-for-one relation between character (or letter) and phoneme (see phonetics). Few alphabets have achieved the ideal exactness.
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. A is a usual symbol for a low central vowel, as in father; the English long a (ā) is pronounced as a diphthong of ĕ and y. The corresponding letter of the Greek alphabet is named alpha. Alpha and omega, the last letter of the Greek alphabet, symbolize the beginning and the end and, in the New Testament, Christ. In musical notationmusical notation,
symbols used to make a written record of musical sounds.

Two different systems of letters were used to write down the instrumental and the vocal music of ancient Greece. In his five textbooks on music theory Boethius (c.A.D. 470–A.D.
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 the letter is the symbol of a note in the scale.

a

(electricity)
(physics)

A

(electricity)
(mechanics)

Å

(mechanics)

A

1. Abbr. for ampere, a unit of electric current.
2. Abbr. for area.

dB(A)

A unit of sound-level; a reading taken on the A-scale of a sound-level meter.

a

, A
the first in a series, esp the highest grade or mark, as in an examination
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the A's, while at the bottom of the final payroll scale in all but the aforementioned 2005 season, are running the "slow but sure" route with a sharp decline in 2008 the exception.
In this case, absent the binding contract rule, a sharp decline in the value of acquirer stock could result in a failure to meet the COI requirement, because the percentage of the total consideration represented by acquirer stock might not be sufficient.
He's a sharp guy,'' said Littlefield, who worked in Montreal's front office when Tracy was the Expos' bench coach in the late 1990s.
Touristically corny as Helen's reverie is, with its footage of camels and pyramids, it provides a sharp ironic parallel between Egypt and Margate itself, a shabbily exotic escape for generations of working-class British holidaymakers.