A block

A block

[′ā ‚bläk]
(civil engineering)
A hollow concrete masonry block with one end closed and the other open and with a web between, so that when the block is laid in a wall two cells are produced.
References in classic literature ?
The streets were very full that day, but we got on pretty well as far as the bottom of Cheapside, where there was a block for three or four minutes.
One of the machines swerved wildly at high speed half a block down, and the next moment, already left well behind it, the pavement was torn into a great hole by a bursting bomb.
Across the street and half a block down, high up in a building, I could see heads peering out.
The ownership of a block of seven claims in the heart of it gave Daylight his grip and they could not come to terms.
Anne perched herself on a block and talked the concert over with him, sure of an appreciative and sympathetic listener in this instance at least.
There was an old barrel there, upside down, one side resting on a block of wood.
About a block back," she said, "I saw a man with hip disease.
I will not accept as the crown of my desires a block of buildings with tenements for the poor on a lease of a thousand years, and perhaps with a sign-board of a dentist hanging out.
A block of flats, constructed with extreme cheapness, towered on either hand.
He found a line of men a block long, but as a wagon chanced to come out of an alley and break the line, he saw his chance and sprang to seize a place.
Jurgis went straightway, and saw a sign hung out, saying that the door would open at seven-thirty; then he walked, or half ran, a block, and hid awhile in a doorway and then ran again, and so on until the hour.
She sat in that storm centre as calmly as if it had been no more than a block of carriages at the opera.