A scale

A scale

[′ā ‚skāl]
(acoustics)
A system used to filter out sound below 55 decibels; its characteristics are equal to those of the human ear.
References in classic literature ?
On a large transparent sheet, compass and square in hand, he was copying what appeared to be a scale of some sort or other.
You must do me the favour,' replied the fish, 'to take a scale from my body, and keep it carefully.
Iwanich bowed, loosened a scale from the body of the grateful beast, put it carefully away, and returned home.
The greater number, instead of leaves, shoot forth blades of capricious shapes, comprised within a scale of colours pink, carmine, green, olive, fawn, and brown.
I imagine this repulsive aspect originates from the features being placed in positions, with respect to each other, somewhat proportional to those of the human face; and thus we obtain a scale of hideousness.
Aleide d'Orbigny, during the years 1825 to 1833, traversed several large portions of South America, and has made a collection, and is now publishing the results on a scale of magnificence, which at once places himself in the list of American travellers second only to Humboldt.
The oral pain medication is given to you after you answer a nurse's question: "On a scale of 1 to 10 what is your level of pain?
Asked to put the Angels-A's rivalry on a scale of 1-10, with Dodgers-Giants being a 10, Angels manager Mike Scioscia played the ``respect'' card.
More generally, when graded on a scale reflecting a variety of measures of financial and policy commitments to population assistance, 13 of 21 donor countries scored A's and B's, and the rest scored C's and D's.