ACE inhibitor


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Related to ACE inhibitor: Angiotensin receptor blocker, Beta blockers

ACE inhibitor

(ā'sē'ē`, ās) or

angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor

(ăn'jēōtĕn`sĭn), drug used to reduce elevated blood pressure (see hypertensionhypertension
or high blood pressure,
elevated blood pressure resulting from an increase in the amount of blood pumped by the heart or from increased resistance to the flow of blood through the small arterial blood vessels (arterioles).
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), to treat congestive heart failurecongestive heart failure,
inability of the heart to expel sufficient blood to keep pace with the metabolic demands of the body. In the healthy individual the heart can tolerate large increases of workload for a considerable length of time.
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, and to alleviate strain on hearts damaged as a result of a heart attack (see infarctioninfarction,
blockage of blood circulation to a localized area or organ of the body resulting in tissue death. Infarctions commonly occur in the spleen, kidney, lungs, brain, and heart.
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). ACE inhibitors block production of an enzyme that helps convert the protein angiotensin 1 into angiotensin 2, a protein that makes blood vessels constrict and promotes retention of fluid, raising blood pressure. Thus ACE inhibitors act to widen the blood vessels and make it easier for the heart to pump blood through the body. captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace), and enalapril (Vasotec) are commonly used ACE inhibitors. Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), reduce hypertension by displacing angiotensin 2 from receptors on the surface of cells. ARBs are used as alternatives to the less expensive ACE inhibitors because they have fewer side effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Until now there's been nothing to give these patients who couldn't take Ace inhibitors and have missed out on the benefits.
Researchers are investigating whether combinations of calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors might be more effective than either treatment used alone.
This study, by researchers from the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary, sought to determine the safety of combination therapy of ACE inhibitors and ARB in the clinical setting as some randomized trials indicate an increased risk of kidney failure.
ACE inhibitors are among the most commonly prescribed medications worldwide because they are indicated in the management of hypertension, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic kidney disease.
Of note, the same magnitude of improvement in femoral neck bone mineral density was seen after just 5 years of ACE inhibitor therapy In other words, no further divergence in bone mineral density occurred during years 5-10.
So if your doctor prescribes an ACE inhibitor or calcium channel blocker, ask for a diuretic instead.
ACE inhibitors act within the RAAS by inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II and, thereby, opposing its physiologic effects on aldosterone secretion, arteriolar vasoconstriction, and water and salt retention.
The group of patients on an antihypertensive other than an ACE inhibitor had a mean decline in exam scores of 0.
This means that ACE inhibitors can be used to improve the symptoms of heart failure, where the heart is not pumping as efficiently, and to improve survival following a heart attack.
ARBs have effects similar to those of ACE inhibitors, and are often used when an ACE inhibitor cannot be tolerated by patients.
Reports in the literature (8) suggest that angio-oedema may occur with one ACE inhibitor and not another.
The occurrence of reported cases of pancreatitis secondary to ACE inhibitors is relatively rare and mostly associated with captopril, enalapril, quinapril, ramipril, perindopril and lisinopril.