ADA Accessibility Guidelines

ADA Accessibility Guidelines

A document illustrating and describing barrier-free handicapped access as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
This suggests that all areas, especially common-use areas, paths of travel, staff areas, public areas and program areas must comply fully with the law and all ADA accessibility guidelines.
The Role of Occupational Therapists in Home Modification Programs at an Area agency on Aging," "The Case for ADA Accessibility Guidelines for the Elderly," "A Key to Aging in Place: Vision Rehabilitation for Older Adults," "Using Home Modifications to Promote Self-Maintenance and Mutual Care: The Case of Old-Age Homes in India," "Does Quality of Life Vary with Different Types of Housing Among Older Persons?
He then covered more than a dozen Title III and Title I rulings, explaining their impact and importance to the industry, including proposed new sections to the ADA Accessibility Guidelines that would establish standards for new or altered "children's facilities," such as day care centers, and accessibility for lottery players within commercial buildings.
The ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), developed by the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board and published in 1991, provide the specific standards that define "accessibility" under the ADA.
The ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), issued by the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (The Access Board), offer specifications for the slope and dimensions of curb ramps.
Two government publications can help security professionals understand the implications of the law: ADA Accessibility Guidelines and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards.
Almost two dozen specific suggested alterations are listed in the ADA Accessibility Guidelines, and even more changes might be necessary for complete compliance.
Updated coverage of sustainable design, eco-friendly materials, interior design, and ADA Accessibility Guidelines
The third edition has been revised to reflect the 2003 IBC building codes and current and proposed ADA Accessibility Guidelines.
ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) do not have a quantitative threshold, either in terms of population percentages or actual numbers, at which they become effective.
The ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), originally developed to help the Department of Justice establish accessibility standards for new construction and alterations, initially did not address correctional facilities.
The Access Board, an independent agency that researchers and develops the ADA Accessibility Guidelines, will be issuing additional guidelines, perhaps as early as this summer, on parks and recreational facilities.