attention deficit disorder

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attention deficit disorder

[ə′ten·shən ¦def·ə·sət dis‚ȯr·dər]
(psychology)
A psychiatric disorder of childhood characterized by attention span problems and impulsivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, some girls do fit the bill of the traditional ADHD kid, as Debra Calderon, 41, of Engleton, TX, knows all too well.
Because ADHD is a disorder that is associated with being forgetful, disorganized, losing things, and inconsistency, I highly recommend once-daily extended release formulations to my patients.
Preschoolers with severe ADHD symptoms can benefit from [Ritalin], but doctors should weigh that benefit against the potential for these very young children to be more sensitive than older children are to the medication's side effects," Greenhill says.
The use of positive verbal praise goes a long way toward fostering better self-esteem for learners with ADHD (McCluskey & McCluskey, 1999).
The case-control family study compared 252 mixed-gender ADHD cases and their parents with 231 non-ADHD control subjects and their parents; the mean age was 11 years among the ADHD cases and 12 years among the controls, and the majority of the children were white.
To provide the appropriate background for understanding the link between ADHD and alcohol use, this article first summarizes the diagnostic criteria for ADHD.
Although ADHD has been the subject of a tremendous amount of research attention (Reid, Maag, & Vasa, 1994), relatively little research has been conducted on ADHD among students receiving special education in the schools.
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): ADHD is a well-known condition, occurring in between 3 and 5 percent of children, more commonly in boys.
At age 5, his family doctor referred him to a psychiatrist because of his behavior, who found that he met the criteria for ADHD and ODD.
The results also showed that the boys diagnosed with ADHD had a substantially greater prevalence of psychiatric disorders as young adults, including major depressive disorder, mood and anxiety disorders, and drug abuse.
But the logic used to justify the forcible drugging of ADHD children is reminiscent of the Soviet mind-set, which emphasized making the subject conform to the state's dictates by any means necessary--including blackmail, kidnapping, and the use of potentially deadly drugs.