asymptotic giant branch

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asymptotic giant branch

(ass-im-tot -ik) See giant.

asymptotic giant branch

[‚a‚sim¦täd·ik ‚jī·ənt ′branch]
(astronomy)
A grouping of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that is roughly asymptotic to the giant branch; it represents a later stage in giant-star evolution in which hydrogen-fusing and helium-fusing shells surround a core in which both hydrogen fusion and helium fusion are exhausted. Abbreviated AGB.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the second type of models, or "common envelope" models, the companion is even closer and fully enters the envelope of the AGB star so that the two objects have a "common" envelope.
From within the common envelope, very high accretion rate disks can either form around the companion from the AGB star material, or the companion can be shredded into a disk around the AGB star core.
International Conference on Why Galaxies Care About AGB Star II.
Papers from the conference, collected here, look at applications of current knowledge about AGB stars, the role of AGB stars in galactic models, and the role of AGB star research within the major aims of astrophysics in the coming decades.
The iron-60 must have come from a supernova, or from a giant star called an AGB star.
The focus of the proposed research is on the chemical properties of AGB stars and their CSEs, and on the structure and dynamics of the mass loss that creates the CSE.
These AGB stars also fall on various periodluminosity relations and the large amplitude AGB variables (Miras) potentially rival Cepheid variables as fundamental calibrators of the distance scale.
Five silica grains were found earlier, but, because of their isotopic compositions, they are thought to originate from AGB stars, red giants that puff up to enormous sizes at the end of their lives and are stripped of most of their mass by powerful stellar winds.
For each of these galaxies extreme mass-losing AGB stars have been identified and characterized.
Using observations of current surface abundances, together with models for the chemical evolution of AGB stars, and linear approximations for other constitutuents of a DD merger, we provide constraints on the past history and, in particular, the progenitor masses of EHe and RCrB stars.
Results were also published of observations Prof Whitelock had obtained using the VISIR camera on the VLT to observe AGB stars in the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidals which were combined with Spitzer results to give mass-loss rates.
Spitzer Space Telescope spectral observations of AGB stars in the Fornax