advanced gas-cooled reactor

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advanced gas-cooled reactor

[əd′vanst ′gas ¦küld rē′ak·tər]
(nucleonics)
A power-generating nuclear reactor which has steel-clad uranium dioxide fuel elements and is cooled by carbon dioxide gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
This depth of experience is shared across domains in courses such as Aggressor 101 (Introduction to Adversary Tactics--a broad look at the entire aggressor program, taught at Nellis and required of all ATG members) and follow-on training, such as AGRS 202, 303, and so forth.
An undisciplined AGRS program can claim that any tactic is valid (observed or postulated to be employed by known adversaries), but truly valid tactical replication depends on the strength of the group's leadership and the proper attitude of its pilots.
After the AGRS drawdown, a former aggressor said, "One way the Air Force is compensating for closing down the Aggressor squadrons is by having operational wings train against each other" (Pennington, "Grounded," 36).
Boots Boothby, original commander of the 64th AGRS, "remembers telling the commander of Tactical Air Command that there was 'a huge wall between operations and intelligence.
Although AGRS measures a physical phenomenon, it is, for geological and exploration purposes, best considered in geochemical terms, i.
A single AGRS measurement provides an estimate of the average surface concentration for an area of several thousand square metres; this area is commonly underlain by variable proportions of bedrock, overburden, soil moisture, open water, and vegetation.
Typically, bedrock concentrations are higher than AGRS values, whereas concentrations in glacial drift are only slightly higher than AGRS values.
The usefulness of AGRS in geological mapping and mineral exploration depends on two factors: 1) the extent to which radioelement distribution relates to bedrock differences and how this distribution may be modified by mineralizing processes; and 2) the extent to which bedrock radioelement content is reflected in surficial materials that can be spatially related to bedrock sources.