Hyperion

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Hyperion

(hīpēr`ēən), in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of SaturnSaturn,
in astronomy, 6th planet from the sun. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics of Saturn

Saturn's orbit lies between those of Jupiter and Uranus; its mean distance from the sun is c.886 million mi (1.
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. Also known as Saturn VII (or S7), Hyperion is the largest highly irregular (nonspherical) body in the solar system, measuring about 255 mi (410 km) by 160 mi (260 km) by 135 mi (220 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 920,310 mi (1,481,100 km) in 21.277 earth days—its rotational period is chaotic. It was discovered in 1848 independently by the American astronomer George Phillips BondBond, George Phillips,
1825–65, American astronomer, b. near Boston, grad. Harvard, 1845. He became the assistant of his father, William Cranch Bond, and in 1859 succeeded him as director of the Harvard College Observatory.
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 and the English astronomer William Lassell. Hyperion is believed to be composed primarily of water and carbon dioxide ice with only a small amount of rocky material; pictures taken by the space probe Cassini show a honeycombed surface that resembles that of a sponge. Hyperion differs from Saturn's other moons in that its surface features are relatively uniform, while the others have distinctly different leading and trailing hemispheres. The largest crater on its surface is c.75 mi (120 km) in diameter and 6 mi (10 km) deep. Hyperion forms a satellite pair with TitanTitan
, in astronomy, the largest of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn VI (or S6), Titan is 3,200 mi (5,150 km) in diameter, orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 759,209 mi (1,221,830 km), and has equal orbital and rotational periods of 15.
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; that is, the two moons interact gravitationally.

Hyperion,

in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan. He was the husband of his sister Theia and the father by her of Helios, Selene, and Eos. It is sometimes said that he was the original sun god.

Hyperion

(hÿ-peer -ee-ŏn) A satellite of Saturn, discovered in 1848. Images taken by Voyager 2 in 1981 showed an elongated irregular body with a ‘chaotic’ spin orientation and rate; this tumbling is due to its irregular shape, its eccentric orbit, and the gravitational effects upon it of Saturn and Titan. Hyperion has a low albedo (0.03) compared with the other icy inner satellites of Saturn, although it is also probably composed largely of ice. The Voyager 2 pictures showed craters with diameters up to 120 km and one long ridge or scarp extending for 300 km; this is named Bond–Lassell in honor of the discoverers of Hyperion, William Cranch Bond, George Philips Bond, and William Lasell. The Cassini–Huygens probe flew by Hyperion in Sept. 2005 at a distance of 500 km. The images it returned reveal a heavily cratered world with a reddish tinge. In the Cassini images Hyperion shows evidence of possible multiple landslides in the past. A vast impact crater 200 km across is surrounded by rays. A mysterious dark material fills many of the craters, See Table 2, backmatter.

Hyperion

[hī′pir·ē·ən]
(astronomy)
A satellite of Saturn approximately 300 miles (480 kilometers) in diameter.

Hyperion

one of the Titans; known for his beauty. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 132]

Hyperion

Titan and father of the sun. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 132]
See: Sun

Hyperion

(computer)
An MS-DOS personal computer that was manufactured in Kanata (near Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) in the mid-1980s. It received considerable government subsidies and, while it was considered well-designed and manufactured and a real threat to the Compaq Portable, the Ottawa firm that designed it was unable to beat Compaq.

Hyperion

(Hyperion Solutions Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, www.hyperion.com) The leading provider of analytical application software for management reporting, analysis, modeling and planning. Founded in 1998 from the merger of Hyperion Software and Arbor Software, company products include Hyperion Pillar (budgeting and planning), Hyperion Essbase (OLAP) and Hyperion Enterprise (financial consolidation and reporting). In 2007, Oracle purchased Hyperion to acquire these quality products.