A. S. Byatt

(redirected from AS Byatt)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Byatt, A. S.

(Antonia Susan Byatt) (bī`ət), 1936–, British novelist; sister of Margaret DrabbleDrabble, Margaret,
1939–, English novelist, b. Sheffield, Yorkshire; sister of A. S. Byatt. Drabble's rigorous and unsentimentally realistic vision of an England split between traditional values and contemporary desires is apparent in such works as The Millstone
..... Click the link for more information.
. Educated at Cambridge, Bryn Mawr College, Pa., and Oxford, she is a noted critic and novelist whose work is erudite, subtle, and passionate. Her best-known novel, Possession (1989)—at once a mystery, a work of Victorian literary scholarship, a romance, and a philosophical inquiry into the nature of love—won the Booker Prize. Byatt's other fiction includes a quartet of novels, The Virgin in the Garden (1978), Still-Life (1985), Babel Tower (1996), and A Whistling Woman (2002), centered around a Yorkshire family and exploring modern English life. Her novella Angels and Insects (1992) and her novel The Biographer's Tale (2001) both examine Victorian times with a contemporary sensibility, while her sweeping later novel, The Children's Book (2009), tells of a writer, her family, and the wider world during years from the late 19th cent. through World War I. Byatt is also known for studies of Iris MurdochMurdoch, Dame Iris
(Dame Jean Iris Murdoch) , 1919–99, British novelist and philosopher, b. Dublin, Ireland, grad. Oxford (1942). In 1948 she was named lecturer in philosophy at Oxford, and in 1963 she was made an honorary fellow of St. Anne's College, Oxford.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (1965, 1976) and other literary essays, e.g., Passions of the Mind (1992) and On Histories and Stories (2000); short stories, e.g., Matisse Stories (1993), Elementals (1999), and Little Black Book of Stories (2004); and fairy tales (1997).

Bibliography

See studies by K. C. Kelly (1996), A. Alfer and M. J. Noble, ed. (2001), C. Franken (2001), L. Hadley (2008), and L. Steveler (2009).

References in periodicals archive ?
Die gedeelde verwysings na Eliot (en spesifiek na Middlemarch) deur sowel Winterbach as Byatt laat die vermoede van 'n moontlike verwantskap tussen die twee eietydse skrywers ontstaan.
The fiction shortlist for the PS10,000 award includes literary heavyweights AS Byatt, Val McDermid and broadcaster and Labour party peer Dame Joan Bakewell, for the Liverpool based She's Leaving Home, her second novel.
Fict ction RAGNAROK: THE END OF THE GODS by AS Byatt (Canongate Books) pounds 14.
The judging panel for the new annual literary prize, which was launched by Sunday Times Magazine deputy editor Cathy Galvin, included Nick Hornby, Lynn Barber, AS Byatt, Hanif Kureishi and Andrew Holgate, literary editor of The Sunday Times.
PAPERBACKS 1 The Children's Book AS Byatt 2 The Road Cormac McCarthy 3 The Little Stranger Sarah Waters 4 The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Stieg Larsson 5 Twenties Girl Sophie Kinsella 6 Naked Juliet Nick Hornby 7 The Girl Who Played With Fire Stieg Larsson 8 Eclipse Stephenie Meyer 9 The Lovers John Connolly 10 Twilight Stephenie Meyer HARDBACKS 1 Breaking Dawn Stephenie Meyer 2 The Five Greatest Warriors Matthew Reilly 3 Beano Annual 2010 4 Shades of Grey Jasper Fforde 5 Operation Mincemeat Ben Macintyre 6 The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest Stieg Larsson 7 The Lost Symbol Dan Brown 8 Mum Knows Best: The Hairy Bikers Family Cookbook 9 The Last 10 Seconds Simon Kernick 10 Dog Days Jeff Kinney
Mantel's work was picked from a shortlist of literary heavyweights including Sarah Waters, AS Byatt and JM Coetzee.
The shortlist for the literary award, that was last year won by Aravind Adiga for his book 'The White Tiger', includes past winners JM Coetzee and AS Byatt.
It includes books by former winner AS Byatt and JM Coetzee, who has triumphed twice previously.
Literary heavyweights AS Byatt and JM Coetzee were named on the 13-strong longlist for the 2009 Booker Prize, released on Tuesday.
Before turning to my discussion of contemporary theory, let me detail some of the momentous intellectual crises of the nineteenth century, specifically as Byatt dramatizes them.
For Nature, "smiling and cruel," as Byatt puts it (32), is neither hospitable nor embracing.
As Byatt portrays Ellen, this response is linked to intellectual timidity and sexual prudery.