abbess

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abbess

the female superior of a convent
References in periodicals archive ?
That's why in these later centuries--the 10th to the 12th centuries--some abbesses were also ordained deacons.
But the fact that the abbesses developed Fontevrault according to the prescribed modes of monastic planning and design does not imply that these women did not leave a distinctive mark on the architecture of Fontevrault.
We can't all become great Abbesses, but we can all be saints.
McNamara has succeeded in conveying a very good sense of the importance of these retired queens and great ladies in their activities as abbesses.
They tried to use the famous distinction between droit and fait of Antoine Arnauld, brother of the two older Arnauld abbesses and the most important Jansenist theologian; the nuns could accept that the doctrines condemned by the pope were heretical (droit) while maintaining a "respectful silence" about whether those heretical doctrines were actually defended by Jansen in the Augustinus (fait).
But in my mind that this accusation against abbesses happened twice in two reigns of popes both named Innocent seems extremely unlikely, and the reference to Berenguela is clearly to the later time period.
Voix des abbesses du Grand Siecle: La Predication au feminin a Port-Royal: Context rhetorique et Dossier.
Egeria, the first Christian pilgrim to leave written evidence of her fourth-century travels through the Holy Land, frequently sought the blessings of priests, abbots, and abbesses.
The founding abbots and abbesses were of royal stock.
The Holy Father expressed this conviction when he met with 220 abbots and abbesses of the Cistercian Order of the Strict Observance--the Trappists--who are holding their general chapter in Rome from September 4- 24.
It is the second new space to be inaugurated by theater director Gerard Violette in five years (the first was the Theatre des Abbesses, opened in 1995).
30) In addition, there were a number of convents, such as Flines, Marquette, and Messines, whose powerful abbesses were embroiled in most of the religious and secular affairs of their respective regions.