Fulda

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Fulda

(fo͝ol`dä), city (1994 pop. 58,710), Hesse, central Germany, on the Fulda River. It is a banking and financial center. Manufactures include textiles and clothing. Fulda grew around a Benedictine abbey founded in 744 by Sturmius, a pupil of St. Boniface, the missionary. From this abbey Christianity was spread throughout central Germany; numerous scholars were associated with the abbey school. From the 13th cent. the abbots of Fulda ruled the town and the surrounding area as princes of the Holy Roman Empire, and in 1752 they were raised to the rank of prince-bishops. Fulda was secularized in 1802, and most of it passed to Hesse-Kassel in 1816. Since 1829, Fulda has again been an episcopal see and is now the site of the annual conference of the Catholic bishops of Germany. A theological seminary is in the city. Noteworthy buildings include the baroque cathedral (1704–12), in the crypt of which St. Boniface is buried; the Michaelskirche (c.820), a Carolingian-style church; and a castle (1720).

Fulda

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the Land (state) of Hesse, on the upper course of the Fulda River, a tributary of the Weser. Population, 60,100 (1974). Fulda is a major railroad junction. The city manufactures textiles, clothing, chemical products, agricultural machinery, and such rubber products as tires. It was the seat of a university from 1734 until 1803.

Fulda developed around a Benedictine abbey founded in 744. In the ninth century the abbey became one of the most important centers of Catholicism in Germany; the abbey’s famous school produced Rabanus Maurus, Einhard, and other important figures of the Carolingian renaissance. Among the city’s architectural treasures are the Carolingian Romanesque Church of St. Michael (c. 820–822, additions made 11th and 14th centuries), a cathedral (1704–12, architect J. Dientzenhofer), and various other baroque buildings. Fulda has a museum featuring works of art produced in the city.

REFERENCE

Kramer, E. Fulda. Munich-Berlin, 1953.

Fulda

 

a river in the Federal Republic of Germany, the left fork of the Weser River. The Fulda is 218 km long and drains an area of about 7,000 sq km. It rises in the Rhön Mountains and has a mean flow rate of approximately 60 cu m per sec, with maximum flow occurring in winter. The Fulda is navigable for 109 km and is canalized. The cities of Fulda and Kassel are situated on the river, and the city of Münden is located at its mouth.