Abbey of Thelema


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Abbey of Thelema

Rabelais’ vision of the ideal society. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua, Plumb, 394]
See: Utopia
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The so-called sinister Abbey of Thelema turned out to be a whitewashed bungalow
Koester's silent film Morning of the Magicians, 2005, recounts his visit to the Abbey of Thelema, a dwelling in Cefalu, Sicily, named as such by Crowley and his followers in 1920, where until mid-1923 they practiced an unusual philosophy that mixed communitarian living with magic.
Among other claims, Geonget proposes that Pantagruelism is more Christian than Stoic (disagreeing with Screech), and based on epikeia (equity); that the name Bacbuc in the Fifth Book includes the syllable buc, which means perplexity in Hebrew, and should be related to the witch Baboue; that agilles is a key word for Evangelicals and for Rabelais; and that we are intended to see the Abbey of Thelema as the Heavenly Jerusalem, and in a sense as the center of the world.
He travelled widely, settling for some years in Sicily with a group of disciples at the Abbey of Thelema.
While Crowley claimed his signature phrase was dictated to him via a disembodied entity called Aiwass, it can be traced back to both Rabelais (whose Abbey of Thelema in Gargantua and Pantagruel had a similar slogan) and St.