Abhinavagupta


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Abhinavagupta

 

Years of birth and death unknown. Indian theoretician of literature and art, poet of the late tenth-early 11th centuries. In Abhinavagupta’s most important works, Dhvanyalokalocana (commentary to the treatise of Anandavardhana) and Abhinavabharati (commentary to the Bharatiyanatyasastra), the theory of the dhvani and rasa received their full development and definitive formulation. In his book Abhinavabharati, Abhinavagupta developed these theories in relation to dramatic art, devoting special attention to the nature of aesthetic enjoyment. A high sensitivity and refinement of analysis in the development of the most complicated concepts of aesthetics and a tendency toward religious interpretation of those are characteristic of Abhinavagupta. He is also known as a philosopher of the Vedanta school.

REFERENCES

De, S. K. History of Sanskrit Poetics, 2nd ed. Calcutta, 1960.
Gnoli, R. The Aesthetical Experience According to Abhinavagupta. Rome, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Introduction to Tantric Philosophy: The Paramarthasara of Abhinavagupta with the Commentary of Yogaraja.
Many historical examples of the interrelation of the faiths are supplied, including a lengthy essay on representations in Islamic manuscripts painted by Sultan Muhammad, and an article on the aesthetics and metaphysics of the Kashmir Saivite, Abhinavagupta.
I shall explore the causation theory espoused by Kashmir Saivism's major thinkers Abhinavagupta and his successor Ksemaraja.
In contrast to Damian's understanding of spiritual life as being antithetical to sexual desire, the older contemporary of Damian teaching in Kashmir, namely the Shaiva exegete Abhinavagupta, writes on the transformation of desire through sexualized ritual as being a path to liberation, the soteriological goal of the Hindu tantric tradition.
Although kama or pleasure was the apparent aim of art in the view of rasa aestheticians, Abhinavagupta in the 11th Century determined that the ultimate emotional experience in art was the bliss of moksa, spiritual freedom.
Among the commentators of Bharata, Bhatta Lollata, Bhatta Sankuka, Bhatta Nayaka, Bhatta Yantra are quoted by Acarya Abhinavagupta in his Abhi.
Moreover, cognitivism has points of contact with a number of non-cognitive literary theories, from Aristotle and Abhinavagupta to the poststructuralists who were so prominent until only recently.
The Kashmiri Shaiva community to which Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta belong is dedicated particularly to Shiva as the supreme God and source of all reality, the deepest ground of human identity, and the bestower of salvation.
Abhinavagupta at the beginning of his Vimarsini on the Isvarapratyabhijna-karika (IPK) does not hesitate to say that Utpaladeva's masterwork is in fact only a "reflect" (pratibimba) of the SD.
Abhinavagupta agrees with Anandavardhana in that the Rasa is suggested by Dhvani but suggestion, of necessity, involves experiencing or idealizing towards an experience.
Having made these preliminary observations on the idea of comparison I wish to turn to the substance of what I wish to say, the conception of self in thinkers who are pivotal in their own traditions, namely Abhinavagupta and Augustine.
Towards a Cognitive Science of Poetics: Anadavardhana, Abhinavagupta, and the Theory of Literature.