Adams, Abigail

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Adams, Abigail,

1744–1818, wife of President John AdamsAdams, Abigail,
1744–1818, wife of President John Adams and mother of President John Quincy Adams, b. Weymouth, Mass., as Abigail Smith. A lively, intelligent woman, she married John Adams in 1764 and more than three decades later became the chief figure in the social life
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 and mother of President John Quincy AdamsAdams, John Quincy,
1767–1848, 6th President of the United States (1825–29), b. Quincy (then in Braintree), Mass.; son of John Adams and Abigail Adams and father of Charles Francis Adams (1807–86).
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, b. Weymouth, Mass., as Abigail Smith. A lively, intelligent woman, she married John Adams in 1764 and more than three decades later became the chief figure in the social life of her husband's administration and one of the most distinguished and influential first ladies in the history of the United States. Her relationship with her husband came as close to a partnership of equals as the culture of the time would allow. Her detailed letters, most written during her husband's wartime absences, are a vivid source of social history.

Bibliography

The correspondence with her husband was edited in a number of volumes by Charles Francis Adams and abridged by M. A. Hogan and C. J. Taylor (2007). The Adams-Jefferson Letters, edited by Lester J. Cappon (1959), includes her letters as well as John's, and letters to her sister, Mary Smith Cranch, are in New Letters of Abigail Adams, 1788–1801, edited by Stewart Mitchell (1947, repr. 1973). See biographies by J. Whitney (1947, repr. 1970), L. E. Richards (1917, repr. 1971), C. W. Akers (1980), and W. Holton (2009); E. B. Gelles, Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage (2009); G. J. Barker-Benfield, Abigail and John Adams: The Americanization of Sensibility (2010); J. J. Ellis, First Family (2010). See also bibliography for Adams, JohnAdams, John,
1735–1826, 2d President of the United States (1797–1801), b. Quincy (then in Braintree), Mass., grad. Harvard, 1755. John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams, founded one of the most distinguished families of the United States; their son, John Quincy
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.

Adams, Abigail (b. Smith)

(1744–1818) First Lady; born in Weymouth, Mass. A minister's daughter, she married John Adams in 1764, beginning a classic partnership that lasted for 54 years. She had no formal schooling but taught herself Latin and then educated her five children, one of whom, John Quincy Adams, became the sixth president. Adams was often away on government business and she ran the family farm in Quincy. She and Adams maintained a long correspondence during those years of separation; her letters displayed a political bent which exceeded that of most Revolutionary period women. She was not overly happy as first lady; she resented both the expense of entertaining and the lack of privacy. She and Adams resided in Philadelphia until 1800, when she supervised the move to Washington, D.C. Following the presidency, she continued her letter writing (Thomas Jefferson was one of her correspondents). She is the only woman to have been both the wife and the mother of U.S. presidents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enter Abigail Adams, an ER Doctor who is thrust onto the World's biggest political stage - albeit against her wishes and her will.
The BVT class of 2015's 81 John and Abigail Adams Scholarship winners represent the school's largest group of Adams Scholars and are eligible to receive tuition waivers if they enroll full-time in a Massachusetts public college or university.
Abigail Adams remained at the second spot and Jacqueline Kennedy held on to her third place compared with their last poll in 2008.
BORN BILL Gates, entrepreneur, 1955 JULIA Roberts, 1967, film actress, above JOAQUIN Phoenix, actor, 1974 DIED TED Hughes, poet, 1998, above ABIGAIL Adams, US first lady, 1818 JOHN Locke, philospopher, 1704
Barker-Benfield, Abigail and John Adams: The Americanization of Sensibility (University of Chicago Press, 2010); and Woody Holton, Abigail Adams (Free Press, 2009).
collects primary source documents that shed light on various aspects of daily life during the American Revolution, organized into 46 section on, for example, newspaper accounts of fires; government efforts to deal with economic problems; reports of theater productions during the war; the impact of smallpox inoculations on a family as illustrated by a letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams; family relations as illustrated by correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and others; loyalist sentiment in a sermon preached by Jonathan Boucher; legal opposition to slavery in Massachusetts; and experiences of fighting in the war as illustrated by memoirs and other documents.
NASDAQ) has amended its merger agreement with Abigail Adams National.
In the letter above, Abigail Adams responds to her husband's complaint that Americans have too little " knowledge of the world.
Where Dolley Madison asked her guests to leave their politics at the door, first lady Abigail Adams was passionately political.
Over the years attendees have seen and heard portrayals of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Theodore Roosevelt, Abigail Adams, and Nathan Hale by their trees.
When John Adams and his fellow patriots were mulling independence from England in the spring of 1776, Abigail Adams famously urged her husband to "remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors.
From Virginia Dare (the first English child born in America) to Abigail Adams (wife of one president and mother of another), from Nelly Bly (who traveled around the world in 72 days in 1889) to Rosa Parks (the "mother of the civil rights movement"), this lavishly illustrated book tells their stories.