abolition

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Related to Abolition movement: abolitionism, abolitionist

abolition

History
1. (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
2. (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
References in periodicals archive ?
The abolition movement therefore set out not to free slaves "but to offer a replacement for slavery consisting of more rigorous and systematic punitive measures" (151).
The article examines the various educational moments that appear in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and then uses those moments to explore Jacobs' role in the abolition movement as well as her impetus to open her own school, the Jacobs Free School in Alexandria, Virginia in 1864.
Before his arrival in Beijing, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman had said of Obama "He is a black President, and he understands the slavery abolition movement and Lincoln"s major significance for that movement.
The nuclear abolition movement dates back to the beginning of the nuclear era itself and was first placed on the world stage in 1982 with Jonathan Schell's The Fate of the Earth.
However, Miller observes that the French trade never inspired a metropolitan abolition movement to equal those in England and North America; absent also are compelling slave narratives to rival English writers such as Olaudah Equiano and Ottobah Cugoano.
Phil Redmond is quoted as saying that criticism that the International Slavery Museum did not properly highlight Liverpool's contribution to the abolition movement "bordered on silly".
Tomkins notes the conflicting accounts of whether Wilberforce (so said his sons) or Thomas Clarkson (so said he) initiated the abolition movement among parliamentary sympathizers.
Rites of August First will prove a valuable resource for anyone interested in the history of the abolition movement, black culture, or the formation of transatlantic and transnational cultures in the nineteenth century.
British actions from the 1820s through the 1840s served to both catalyze and paralyze the abolition movement.
We need to find those women in order to honor this book's reference to the abolition movement in the U.
Along with Blanchard, Finney, and Beecher, other Christians were deeply involved not only in the abolition movement, but also in reform efforts regarding temperance, the role of women, peacemaking, and many other issues of the day.
Their only hope for justice lies with the abolition movement and an inexperienced lawyer.