Absorption chiller


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Absorption chiller

A water-chilling process in which cooling is accomplished by the evaporation of a fluid (usually water), which is then absorbed by a different solution (usually lithium bromide), then evaporated under heat and pressure. The fluid is then condensed with the heat of condensation ejected through a cooling tower.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 [degrees]C, evaporator temperature 4 [degrees]C, being close to real working conditions in the absorber of an absorption chiller driven by hot water at 85 [degrees]C and cooled by water at 27 [degrees]C.
For example, the double-effect absorption chiller used here was originally designed to accept heat from a combustion chamber, but it was redesigned with an advanced heat exchanger to accept heat from the microturbine exhaust (Rosfjord et al.
The maximum cold water flow rate of the waste-heat utilization absorption chiller is set at 130% of the rated quantity of flow.
GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE II-46 Table 8: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Absorption Chillers by Geographic Region - US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), Latin America and Rest of World Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ Thousand for Years 2010 through 2018 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-46
For the design of the heat exchangers of the air-cooled absorption chiller prototype, detailed numerical codes have been developed.
The first step taken in analyzing the absorption chiller was determining the temperature of the hot water leaving the generator.
The cooling plant, shown in Figure 1, consists of three chillers of equal rated capacity (one direct-fired absorption chiller and two centrifugal chillers), three variable-speed cooling towers, and six fixed-speed pumps (three for the evaporator water loop and three for the condenser water loop).
Tri-generation systems combine the benefits of cogeneration systems with an absorption chiller, which use hot water to provide the energy needed to drive the cooling process.
The recovered heat is made available for the absorption chiller (heat fraction) and/or the heating load.
Makeup water (for cooling towers), if significant, such as for an absorption chiller compared to a motor-driven vapor-compression chiller.