Acadians


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Acadians

America’s lost tribe; suffered expulsion under British. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 2; Am. Lit.: “Evangeline” in Hart, 263]
References in periodicals archive ?
She is referring, of course, to the central legend of Acadia, the event that sits at the heart of the land like a great symbolic mountain: Le Grand Derangement of the Acadians in 1755, one of the most scurrilous and complex chapters in Canadian history.
His narrative is a double helix, twisting together the experience of individual Acadians with the history of the development of government policies and with the reaction of communities to the implementation by officials of such policies.
Some Acadians dissented from the continuing focus on the tragedy of 1755 by self-proclaimed Acadian leaders.
Becoming Cajun, Becoming American: The Acadian in American Literature from Longfellow to James Lee Burke.
Beginning in 1755, and continuing until the 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War between the French and English, 12,618 Acadians living in Nova Scotia - and many who had made their way to other parts of the Maritimes to escape deportation - were rounded up and placed on ships and sent to Massachusetts, Louisiana and many other parts of the United States, England and France.
Acadians often use the expression jeteux de sorts to refer to an individual known to cast spells, while the term sorcier or sorciere is more commonly used to refer to a person who has acquired a wide reputation over time as a practitioner of witchcraft and who is closely identified with the practice.
She has both deftly captured Nova Scotia's pioneer society and sympathetically addressed the expulsion of the Acadians, making Lightning and Blackberries a welcome addition to young adult Canadian historical fiction.
Expanding on Nadeau's ideas, in this article I explore the affinities between two Latin American spaces that struggle to preserve their identity in opposition to the Anglo world that surrounds them: namely, Acadians in Atlantic Canada and Chicanos in the American Southwest (from California to Texas), a space reclaimed by Mexican-American activists under the name of Aztlan.
French Acadians began settling in the Grand Pre area of Nova Scotia in the 17th century, where they devised a complex system of sod dikes to convert 3,000 acres of tidal marshes into rich cropland.
It puts us before an act of eighteenth-century genocide and offers a detailed account of this "tragic story of expulsion of the French Acadians from their North American homeland.
Most importantly, the Acadians had little use for government, beyond the barest minimum necessary in a culture devoted to the individual pursuit of happiness.