Acanthaster Planci


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Acanthaster Planci

 

a starfish of the phylum Echinodermata measuring as much as 50 cm across. A. planci is found on coral reefs in the tropical regions of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Its body is covered with numerous sharp needles reaching 3 cm in length. Stings are extremely painful and cause severe poisoning in humans. The starfish feeds on polyps and madrepores. In the 1960’s massive numbers of the starfish appeared in many regions and caused the complete destruction of corals on extensive areas of reefs (for example, on Guam, in some areas of the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, and on the Fiji Islands). The principal control measure is the destruction of the starfish with injections of Formalin, which are administered by teams of divers.

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Investigation of the anti-cancer potential of Acanthaster planci starfish extract along with Tamoxifen (a non-steroidal selective estrogen receptor modulator) in human breast cancer cells indicated that the sea star extract compared with Tamoxifen ([IC.
Bacteria on the surface of crustose coralline algae induce metamorphosis of the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci.
Orden valvatida Perrier, 1884 Familia Oreasteridae Fisher, 1911 Genero Nidorellia Gray, 1840 Nidorellia armata (Gray, 1840) Genero Pentaceraster Doderlein, 1916 Pentaceraster cuminigi (Gray, 1840) Familia Acanthasteridae Sladen, 1889 Genero Acanthaster Gervais, 1841 Acanthaster planci (Linnaeus, 1758) Familia Mithrodiidae viguier, 1878 Genero Mithrodia Gray, 1840 Mithrodia bradleyi (verrill, 1870) Familia Ophidiasteridae verrill, 1870 Genero Pharia Gray, 1840 Pharia pyramidatus (Gray, 1840) Genero Phataria Gray, 1840 Phataria unifascialis (Gray, 1840) Orden Forcipulatida Perrier, 1884 Familia Heliasteridae viguier, 1878 Genero Heliaster Gray, 1840 Heliaster kubinijii (Xantus, 1860)
The more commonly accepted view claims that the recent Acanthaster planci outbreaks result from human action.
Coral reef recovery on Guam (Micronesia) after catastrophic predation by Acanthaster planci.
1996) and the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is gray with dull red markings in the Pacific but iridescent blue or pink in the Indian Ocean (Benzie 1992).
Reproductive biology, spawning and field fertilization rates of Acanthaster planci.
researchers have turned up spines of Acanthaster planci in ancient reef sediment and dated them to 8,000 years ago, near the time the reef began to form.
Complete mitochondrial genome sequences for Crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci and Acanthaster brevispinus.
1987) y Doherty y Davidson (1988) determinaron que el incremento abundancia de Acanthaster planci pudo haber sido causada por el aumento en el reclutamiento de las larvas.