Acaricides


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Related to Acaricides: miticide

Acaricides

 

chemical agents used to combat mites. Most effective against the herbivorous mites are the organophos-phorus insecticides (metaphos, methylnitrophos, trichlor-metaphos, and others) and, in particular, the so-called systemic insecticides (phosphamidon, methylmercaptophos, octamethyl pyrophosphoramide, and others), which make it possible to protect the plants for a protracted period. Also effective as acaricides are aromatic alcohols, esters of acids, sulfides, sulfones, azobenzene, nitrophenols, and certain organic compounds of fluorine, as well as sulfur preparations (in a ground form, as colloidal preparations, or in the form of calcium or barium polysulfides obtained by dissolving sulfur in lime; such a solution is known as lime-sulfur spray). Organophosphorus and organochlorine insecticides, carbamates, and others are used for combating ixodoid ticks.

Some acaricides are given in Table 1.

REFERENCES

Berim, N. G. Khimicheskaia zashchita rastenii. Leningrad, 1966.
Mel’nikov, N. N. Khimiia pestitsidov. Moscow, 1968.

N. N. MEL’NIKOV

Table 1
NameFormulaMelting temperature(°c)Dos (kglha)
1 Boiling point at absolute pressure of 8 newtons per square meter (0.06 mm of mercury)
Kelthane ...............................Table 178.5–790.2–0.6
Milbex .................................Table 1123.5–124: 69.5–700.5–1.0
Tedion (tetradichlon) ....................Table 1146.5–147.50.7–1.5
Chlorbenside (chlorparacide) .............Table 1720.2–0.6
Chlorobenzilate .........................Table 1141–1420.2–0.8
Chlorophenylchlorobenzenesulfonate (Ovotran) ............................Table 186.50.5–1.0
References in periodicals archive ?
Mite-related damage can develop in plant parts distant from mite feeding as well as after mites have been controlled with an acaricide, suggesting symptoms are the result of systemic mite toxins (Bassett 1981).
50] value, heterogenicity, regression equation, fiducial limit of the acaricides and botanical is given in Table 1.
Use of chemical acaricides is the most common and effective method of killing ticks.
During our study, we initially were interested in determining the infestation rate in all the colonies and to highlight the acaricide activity of essential oils of rosemary and mint in order to develop a struggle against varroa [1].
This could be due to differences in management and use of acaricides, plus the difference in the genetic component of animals evaluated in both studies.
In light of the results of the present study proper attention should be given to managmental conditions and Acaricides should be used at regular intervals to ensure ticks control.
Only a limited number of acaricides (chemicals that kill ticks) are available to cattle producers, and ticks have developed resistance to most, including pyrethroids, organophosphates, and amitraz, Guerrero says.
microplus has resisted conventional acaricides through mutations in active site of acetylcholinesterase, GABA receptor, and sodium channels (MUTERO et al.