acid mine drainage

(redirected from Acid rock drainage)
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acid mine drainage

[′as·əd ′mīn ‚drā·nij]
(mining engineering)
Drainage from bituminous coal mines containing a large concentration of acidic sulfates, especially ferrous sulfate.
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Pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage are the most important environmental problems in mining environments.
The main environmental issues associated with the industry include greenhouse gas emission, energy consumption, water use and recycling, metal leaching and acid rock drainage (ARD), and the geotechnical stability of large volumes of solid wastes.
Daniels WL, Orndorff ZW (2003) Acid rock drainage from highway and construction activities in Virginia, USA.
When prevention is not practical due to technical or economics limitations then activities intended to mitigate the consequence of the formation of acid rock drainage shall become the objective of restoration work.
But perhaps the most potentially devastating environmental problem arising from the mine is the prediction of acid rock drainage that could mobilise highly toxic forms of copper and poison the river.
David Blowes, a professor at the University of Waterloo, who was nominated for his extensive research and scientific contributions in the field of geochemistry and acid rock drainage, and Mr John Morgan, a mining engineer and consultant, who was nominated for his fundamental work in the area of surface reclamation in the coal industry.
As a result, Canada is now a world leader in the field of acid rock drainage, making an important contribution to protecting the environment and human health.
The metal leaching / acid rock drainage characteristics of waste rock is a key component that, along with preliminary mine design, will be the focus of technical work to be undertaken in 2006.
Exposure of these sulfide containing materials to air and oxygen generates approximately 95 million gallons acid rock drainage a year.
Naturally occurring acid rock drainage has been around as long as sulfide minerals, air, and water have, and anthropogenic AMD dates back to at least the Middle Ages.
The objective of the course is to provide participants with a practical understanding and hands-on-experience with the state-of-the-art in metal leaching and acid rock drainage.