Acids


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Related to Acids: Strong acids

Acids

 

chemical compounds containing hydrogen that can be replaced by a metal to form salts and dissociating when dissolved in water to form H+ ions (protons) or, more accurately, hydronium ions, H3O+. According to current ideas certain compounds that do not contain hydrogen are also included in the acid group.

References in classic literature ?
The accidental breaking of his jar of acid has burnt the Baron's hands severely.
Would he obtain air by chemical means, in getting by heat the oxygen contained in chlorate of potash, and in absorbing carbonic acid by caustic potash?
Waldron was a strict disciplinarian with a gift of acid humor, as exemplified upon the gentleman with the red tie, which made it perilous to interrupt him.
No one had ever told the form-master before that he talked nonsense, and he was meditating an acid reply, in which perhaps he might insert a veiled reference to hosiery, when Mr.
Over the whole field, previously so gaily beautiful with the glitter of bayonets and cloudlets of smoke in the morning sun, there now spread a mist of damp and smoke and a strange acid smell of saltpeter and blood.
As he dropped the last grisly fragment of the dismembered and mutilated body into the small vat of nitric acid that was to devour every trace of the horrid evidence which might easily send him to the gallows, the man sank weakly into a chair and throwing his body forward upon his great, teak desk buried his face in his arms, breaking into dry, moaning sobs.
I am afraid there is some acid upon that too, and it is rather damp and torn.
The acid bite of belly desire had long since deserted him, and he, too, ate from a sense of duty, all meat tasting alike to him.
Martin went into the kitchen with a sinking heart, the image of her red face and slatternly form eating its way like acid into his brain.
In the corners stood carboys of acid in wicker baskets.
But it was not enough to renew the oxygen; they must absorb the carbonic acid produced by expiration.
And here his sagacity must make it needless to observe how artfully these chapters are calculated for that excellent purpose; for in these we have always taken care to intersperse somewhat of the sour or acid kind, in order to sharpen and stimulate the said spirit of criticism.