carcinoma

(redirected from Acinic cell carcinoma)
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carcinoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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.

carcinoma

[‚kärs·ən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant epithelial tumor.

carcinoma

Pathol
1. any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
2. another name for cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid gland: A 15-year review limited to a single surgeon at a single institution.
Acinic cell carcinoma of the sublingual gland accompanied by bone formation.
4) Ellies et al found that patients with low-grade acinic cell carcinoma had a 5-year survival rate of 100%.
Acinic cell carcinomas account for approximately 6% of all salivary gland neoplasms and are the fourth most common salivary malignant neoplasm, following mucoepidermoid carcinomas, adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified, and adenoid cystic carcinoma.
By definition, acinic cell carcinomas recapitulate serous differentiation, at least focally.
Well-differentiated acinic cell carcinoma of salivary glands associated with lymphoid stroma.
The results of treating acinic cell carcinoma are quite variable.
Most published series of patients with acinic cell carcinoma are limited, and they represent the experiences of institutions rather than individual surgeons.
An additional important diagnostic clue is the presence of vacuolated cells, which are rather unique (although not pathognomonic) for acinic cell carcinoma.
Still, for acinic cell carcinoma, surgical stage remains a better predictor of clinical outcome than histologic grade.
In one case in our series, cytology was misleading in a parotid mass that was read as an adenoma but which proved to be an acinic cell carcinoma at surgery.
Neoplasms pose a particular challenge to the cytopathologist because of the wide spectrum of tumors, including (in order of increasing potential for malignancy) pleomorphic adenomas, adenolymphomas (Warthin's tumor), acinic cell carcinomas, adenoid-cystic carcinomas, and mucoepidermoid carcinomas.