Acorns


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Acorns

 

the fruit of oaks. An acorn contains a seed com-posed of a small embryo, two large fleshy seed halves with food reserves, and a sheath. The base of the acorn is covered by a cupped husk.

Acorns ripen at the end of September or the beginning of October; they fall to the ground with the coming of frosts. Collected for planting after they fall from the trees, the acorns are covered with layers of sand or earth and then stored at temperatures from +3° to -2°C. Acorns are used for making a coffee substitute and for animal feed (particularly for swine). After being carefully dried for winter storage, the acorns should be hulled and ground. They have little protein but are rich in easily digested carbohydrates, chiefly starch. In 100 kg of fresh unshelled acorns there are approximately 70 nutritional units and 2.5 kg of digestible protein; in dried unshelled acorns there are 115 nutritional units and 4.3 kg of protein. Acorns also contain tannins which give them an acidic and bitter taste and have a constipating effect. For partial extraction of these substances, acorns are soaked in cold water. It is recommended that they be mixed with feeds that have a laxative effect, such as brans, roots, and molasses.

References in classic literature ?
I haven't heard Frank laugh so much for ever so long," said Grace to Amy, as they sat discussing dolls and making tea sets out of the acorn cups.
There lay the acorns, scattered all over the floor.
This was proved by the hamadryad, who, being exceedingly fond of mischief, threw another handful of acorns before the twenty- two newly-restored people; whereupon down they wallowed in a moment, and gobbled them up in a very shameful way.
The most tasteful front-yard fence was never an agreeable object of study to me; the most elaborate ornaments, acorn tops, or what not, soon wearied and disgusted me.
And so still the forest was you could have heard an acorn drop or a bird call from one end of it to the other.
It is, however, a more profitable employment to trace the constituent principles of future greatness in their kernel; to detect in the acorn at our feet the germ of that majestic oak, whose roots shoot down to the centre, and whose branches aspire to the skies.
I daresay it's a very ugly cap, and I used to think when I saw her here as it was nonsense for her to dress different t' other people; but I never rightly noticed her till she came to see mother last week, and then I thought the cap seemed to fit her face somehow as th 'acorn-cup fits th' acorn, and I shouldn't like to see her so well without it.
She made herself rather cheap by inclining her face toward him, but he merely dropped an acorn button into her hand, so she slowly returned her face to where it had been before, and said nicely that she would wear his kiss on the chain around her neck.
Once the lowest form of life has established itself, the final advent of man is as certain as the growth of the oak from the acorn.
it's me, and me's the first person singular, nominative case, agreeing with the verb "it's", and governed by Squeers understood, as a acorn, a hour; but when the h is sounded, the a only is to be used, as a and, a art, a ighway,' replied Mr Squeers, quoting at random from the grammar.
The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn, and Egypt, Greece, Rome, Gaul, Britain, America, lie folded already in the first man.
As Collingwood never saw a vacant place in his estate but he took an acorn out of his pocket and popped it in; so deal with your compliments through life.