Perseus

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Perseus

(pûr`sēəs, –so͝os), in Greek mythology, son of Zeus and Danaë. His grandfather, Acrisius, had been warned by an oracle that his grandson would kill him and therefore put Perseus and his mother in a chest and threw it into the sea. It drifted to Seriphus, where King Polydectes befriended the two. After a time Polydectes fell in love with Danaë but was embarrassed by the presence of her full-grown son. He sent Perseus to fetch the head of the Gorgon Medusa, thinking that Perseus would die in the attempt. The gods, however, loved Perseus. Hermes gave him a curved sword and winged sandals, Athena a mirrorlike shield, and Hades a helmet that made Perseus invisible. Thus armed, Perseus slew Medusa. While fleeing the other Gorgons, Medusa's sisters, Perseus asked Atlas for help. Atlas refused, and Perseus, by means of the Medusa head, promptly turned him into a mountain of stone. On his way home Perseus rescued Andromeda from a sea monster and married her. When he arrived in Seriphus, he killed Polydectes and his followers. He then gave the Medusa head to Athena. He went with his mother and his wife to Argos. There, while competing in a discus contest, Perseus accidentally killed his grandfather. Thus the prophecy was fulfilled. Perseus was the father of Electryon, who was the grandfather of Hercules. The famous figure of Perseus by Benvenuto Cellini stands in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence.

Perseus,

c.212–166 B.C., last king of Macedon (179–168 B.C.), son and successor of Philip V. He intrigued against his younger brother, Demetrius, eventually bringing about the latter's execution by Philip V. As king, his involvement in Greek politics excited the fears of Eumenes II of PergamumPergamum
, ancient city of NW Asia Minor, in Mysia (modern Turkey), in the fertile valley of the Caicus. It became important c.300 B.C., after the breakup of the Macedonian empire, when a Greek family (the Attalids) established a brilliant center of Hellenistic civilization.
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, who, thinking that Pergamum's position was being endangered, went to Rome to provoke war against Perseus by pointing to alignments of Macedon with anti-Roman factions in Greece. The resultant Third Macedonian War (171–168) began with a Macedonian cavalry victory and then dragged on indecisively. Finally Aemilius PaullusPaullus, Aemilius
(Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus) , c.229–160 B.C., Roman general. He was curule aedile (193 B.C.), praetor (191), and consul (182). In his consulship he conquered the Inguani, a Ligurian people.
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 took command of the Roman forces and soundly defeated (168) Perseus at Pydna on the Gulf of Thessaloníki. Perseus died in captivity.

Perseus,

in astronomy, northern constellationconstellation,
in common usage, group of stars that appear to form a configuration in the sky; properly speaking, a constellation is a definite region of the sky in which the configuration of stars is contained.
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 lying E of Cassiopeia and N of Taurus. It contains the bright star Mirfak (Alpha Persei) and AlgolAlgol
, famous variable star in the constellation Perseus; Bayer designation β Persei; 1992 position R.A. 3h07.7m, Dec. +40°55'. Algol's variation in apparent magnitude, from 2.06 to 3.
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 (Beta Persei), a visible variable starvariable star,
star that varies, either periodically or irregularly, in the intensity of the light it emits. Other physical changes are usually correlated with the fluctuations in brightness, such as pulsations in size, ejection of matter, and changes in spectral type, color, or
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 of the type known as an eclipsing variable. Perseus contains two star clustersstar cluster,
a group of stars near each other in space and resembling each other in certain characteristics that suggest a common origin for the group. Stars in the same cluster move at the same rate and in the same direction.
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 (NGC 869 and NGC 884) that are visible to the naked eye, as well as an open cluster (M34) that is barely visible. A meteor showermeteor shower,
increase in the number of meteors observed in a particular part of the sky. The trails of the meteors of a meteor shower all appear to be traceable back to a single point in the sky, known as the radiant point, or radiant.
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 known as the Perseids appears to radiate from a star in Perseus; this shower can be seen every year for several nights beginning Aug. 10, after midnight. In 1901 a brilliant nova was observed in the constellation. Perseus reaches its highest point in the evening sky in late December.

Perseus

(per -see-ŭs, per -syooss) A fairly conspicuous constellation in the northern hemisphere near Cassiopeia, lying in the Milky Way. It has two bright stars – Mirfak (α) and the prototype eclipsing binary Algol (β) – and several of about 3rd magnitude. It also contains the naked-eye double cluster h and Chi Persei, several open clusters including the just-visible M34 (NGC 1039), the California nebula, and the galaxy NGC 1275, which is a powerful radio source and lies in the Perseus cluster. Abbrev.: Per; genitive form: Persei; approx. position: RA 3.5h, dec +45°; area: 615 sq deg.

Perseus

 

Born circa 213 B.C.; died circa 166 B.C. Last king of Macedonia; ruled from 179 to 168 B.C.

Perseus strove to restore the power of Macedonia that had been undermined by the wars of his father, Philip V, with Rome (the first Macedonian War [215-205 B.C.] and the Second Macedonian War [200-197 B.C.]). He organized and led an anti-Roman coalition, forming an alliance with the Illyrian tribes, the Thracians, the Seleucid state, and Rhodes and other Greek islands. He supported democratic groupings everywhere that were hostile to Rome. In the early part of the Third Macedonian War, which began in 171 B.C., Perseus won several victories on land (in Thessaly) and sea (at Euboea), but on June 22-23, 168, in a battle near Pydna in Macedonia, his army was defeated. Perseus was captured and brought to Italy, where he died in confinement.


Perseus

 

a hero in ancient Greek mythology, son of Danaë and Zeus. According to the myth, Perseus’ grandfather, King Acrisius of Argos, was told by an oracle that he would die at the hands of his grandson. He ordered that Perseus and Danaë be placed in a chest and cast into the sea. The two were rescued by fishermen and settled on the island of Seriphus. From here, Perseus set out to capture the head of the Gorgon Medusa. On the way back he freed Andromeda, the daughter of King Ceph-eus, from a sea monster and married her. Perseus returned to his homeland and during a discus-throwing contest accidentally killed Acrisius. He then left Argos and became ruler in Tiryns. The founding of the city of Mycenae is attributed to him. According to later myths, Perseus and Andromeda were carried up to the heavens and turned into constellations. The myth of Perseus has been a popular theme in art, as seen in the work of Tintoretto, Titian, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Tiepolo.

REFERENCES

Woodward, J. M. Perseus, a Study in Greek Art and Legend. Cambridge, 1937.
Schauenburg, K. Perseus in der Kunst des Altertums. Bonn, 1960.

Perseus

[′pər·sē·əs]
(astronomy)
A northern constellation; right ascension 3 hours; declination 45°N.

Perseus

ever devoted to wife, Andromeda. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 200]