acrostic

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acrostic

(əkrŏ`stĭk), arrangement of words or lines in which a series of initial, final, or other corresponding letters, when taken together, stand in a set order to form a word, a phrase, the alphabet, or the like. A famous acrostic was made on the Greek for Jesus Christ, God's Son, Savior: Iesous Christos, Theou Uios, Soter (ch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ichthus, Greek for fish; hence the frequent use of the fish by early Christians as a symbol for Jesus. There are several alphabetic acrostics (pertaining to the Hebrew alphabet) in the Bible, e.g., in Ps. 119 and LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
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. Acrostic verses are common, and very elaborate puzzles have been devised combining several schemes.

Acrostic

 

a poem in which the first letter of each line forms a word or phrase when read from the top downward. Acrostics originated in ancient Greek poetry and are found in Russian poetry from the 17th century onward. Poems in which a word is formed from the last letter of each line (telestic) or the middle letter (mesostic) occur less frequently. The sonnet “To Valerii Briusov” by M. Kuzmin is an acrostic. The first three lines read:

Voluminous waves direct their surf
At cliffs that still stand firm.
Lo! An eagle flies past the pitiful sights . . .   

acrostic

a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc., so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet
References in periodicals archive ?
Emerald's online advertising contest, which invited consumers to create their own EMERALD NUTS acrostics, drew over 12,500 entries.
The most interesting acrostics are frequently those that start a sentence on one line and end it on another.
The point is worthwhile on two counts: first, this approach eschews the textual emendations customarily favored in order to get the acrostics to work as expected; and second, it may show the poetic artistry of the texts which play on the expected form with all sorts of artistic subtlety.
Additional acrostics include a double acrostic involving the initial and second letter of each versicle (these letters are duplicated in the margin) and an abecedarium (fol.
I also recommend reverse acrostics as a tool for teachers of composition and creative writing.
With a significant increase in brand recognition and sales following last year's Super Bowl commercial and extensive enthusiasm for its acrostics, or "letter game," approach, Emerald intends to supercharge its broadcast, print and online advertising campaign with a new twist to its previous commercials' visuals-driven "EN" guessing game.
Readers can also subscribe for Premium Crosswords, a unique range of New York Times crossword puzzles that includes five years of daily and weekend puzzles and their solutions, both puzzles from the Sunday Magazine, and a selection of acrostics and Web-only puzzles.
Mike Keith was able to find only four F,U,C,K acrostics in 60 million lines in Project Gutenberg texts, including A Prefect's Uncle by P.
A word fitly spoken; poetic artistry in the first four acrostics of the Hebrew Psalter.
The texts range from hymns, prayers, and services to lyric and epic poetry, and include epitaphs, sonnets, ballads, elegies, haiku, acrostics, and much more.
Naturally enough, given the circumstances, few were inclined to believe that it was, and in vain did the governor's office, denying all culpability, scramble to produce previous Schwarzenegger missives containing such unintended acrostics as "soap" and "poet" in order to show that such uncontrived word-forming letter lineups do, in fact, often occur by chance.
His examples range from George Moses Horton, a slave with a talent for acrostics and poetry, to Edgar Allan Poe.