acrostic

(redirected from Acrostics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Acrostics: double acrostics

acrostic

(əkrŏ`stĭk), arrangement of words or lines in which a series of initial, final, or other corresponding letters, when taken together, stand in a set order to form a word, a phrase, the alphabet, or the like. A famous acrostic was made on the Greek for Jesus Christ, God's Son, Savior: Iesous Christos, Theou Uios, Soter (ch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ichthus, Greek for fish; hence the frequent use of the fish by early Christians as a symbol for Jesus. There are several alphabetic acrostics (pertaining to the Hebrew alphabet) in the Bible, e.g., in Ps. 119 and LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Acrostic verses are common, and very elaborate puzzles have been devised combining several schemes.

Acrostic

 

a poem in which the first letter of each line forms a word or phrase when read from the top downward. Acrostics originated in ancient Greek poetry and are found in Russian poetry from the 17th century onward. Poems in which a word is formed from the last letter of each line (telestic) or the middle letter (mesostic) occur less frequently. The sonnet “To Valerii Briusov” by M. Kuzmin is an acrostic. The first three lines read:

Voluminous waves direct their surf
At cliffs that still stand firm.
Lo! An eagle flies past the pitiful sights . . .   

acrostic

a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc., so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet
References in periodicals archive ?
Acrostics occur in Psalms 25, 34, 37, m, 112, 199, 145; Proverbs 31:10-31; and Lamentations 1-4.
In "More About Acrostics," the poet discusses various aspects of the acrostic including its etymology.
identity into the acrostics that he composes in the margins of his
The most interesting acrostics are frequently those that start a sentence on one line and end it on another.
The point is worthwhile on two counts: first, this approach eschews the textual emendations customarily favored in order to get the acrostics to work as expected; and second, it may show the poetic artistry of the texts which play on the expected form with all sorts of artistic subtlety.
Additional acrostics include a double acrostic involving the initial and second letter of each versicle (these letters are duplicated in the margin) and an abecedarium (fol.
It is improbable that the two acrostics, placed so strategically at the beginning and the end, are undeliberate or inauthentic.
A popular form is double acrostics, puzzles constructed so that not only the initial letters of the lines but in some cases also the middle or last letters form words.
It also offers an exclusive online collection of more than 2,000 New York Times crossword puzzles including five years of daily and weekend puzzles and their solutions, both puzzles from the Sunday Magazine, and a selection of acrostics and Web-only puzzles.
Sir Linkalot gives advice on how to remember things: through rhyme; through acrostics spelling, sequences; through people or things; through visual links, stories, letters, numbers, humour.
His introduction discusses such matters as the place of Lamentations in the canon, authorship, Mesopotamian links, alphabetic acrostics, texts and versions, and theology.
Judge for yourself in this puzzle which progresses from single through five letter acrostics of the same collection of nineteen quotations.