Adamah

Adamah

(ăd`əmə), in the Bible, Naphtalite city.
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Campers publicly make a Brit Adamah (covenant with the earth), a Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-limited (SMART) commitment to an action they'll undertake at home.
Froman's essays were recently published as Sokhaki Eretz: Shalom, 'Am, Adamah (Tel Aviv Reuven Mass, 2014).
Keep humans and Earth, adam and adamah, connected (Genesis 2)?
3:19) establishes that humanity was formed from the adamah which is God's creation, Isaiah and Hosea in particular remind us that "earth" is used to designate humankind.
Adam's very name (from adamah, earth, ground) reminds us where we came from and where we're headed.
No matter because on the stroke of half-time Adamah skilfully controlled an incoming ball from Dani Ayala inside the penalty area before lofting a delightful chip over the keeper and into the net.
On the occasion, Parsons International Safety Manager Engineer Cornelius Adamah gave a talk on o[umlaut]Safety, a Value or a Priority'.
This version of the myth obviously reminds us of the Biblical story of Adam as made from "dust": the Hebrew adamah means "red clay" or "red soil," hence also "ground," "earth," "land," "country"; the Hebrew root adam means "to show blood (in the face)," "to turn rosy," "to flush," "to be red/ruddy," "to be made red," "to be dyed red," and "ruddy" (i.
Such an extreme dualist view runs counter to our own human experience--and as that experience is so eloquently expressed in the first chapter of the Hebrew Bible, Genesis, which says that God took a little adamah, "earth," and blew God's ruach, "spirit," into it and created ha adam, literally "the earthling" (not "the male," as often misunderstood), and God saw that what God had done was mod tov, very good
In Hebrew, Adam is a pun on adamah, the word for "earth" or "land.
that reaches out to migrant farmworkers, gang members and addicts; and Adamah Farm, a program of the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center in Falls Village, Conn.
Significantly, this dust is adamah (equated by Blake with the female genitals.