Adam style

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Adam style

(1728–1792)
An architectural style based on the work of Robert Adam and his brothers, predominantly in England and strongly influential in the United States and elsewhere. It is characterized by a clarity of form, use of color, subtle detailing, and unified schemes of interior design. Basically Neoclassical, it adopted Neo-Gothic, Egyptian, and Etruscan motifs.

Adam style

An architectural style based on the work of Robert Adam (1728–1792) and his brothers, predominant in England in the late 18th century and strongly influential in the US, Russia, and elsewhere. It is characterized by clarity of form, use of color, subtle detailing, and unified schemes of interior design. Basically Neoclassical, it also adapted Neo-Gothic, Egyptian, and Etruscan motifs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brick-built with stone dressings and a slate roof, it has a Venetian window, panelled rooms and an Adamesque (neo-classical) ceiling.
Arthur Davies, the distinguished interior designer often used by Cunard, spun a pot pourri of public spaces which included a Carolean smoking room, Palladian lounge, Louis XVI restaurant, Adamesque drawing room, Jacobean grill room and an indoor pool with Egyptian replicas from the British Museum.
George Richardson's A Book of Ceilings, the first plates of which were completed in 1776, is an oft-quoted and fertile source for Adamesque designs in Ireland, and Lucey identifies Stapleton's recognisable borrowings.
The craftsmanship of the Adamesque panelling and Rococo plasterwork are still in place, fused in with the Edwardian mod cons of big handbasins in bedroom alcoves.
Constructed in 1920 by Edgar and Arch Selwyn, the theater was designed in the Adamesque style by architects de Rosa and Periera featuring a limestone facade and open colonnade.
Being brought up at the toy-fort-like Glin Castle on the River Shannon in south-west Ireland, I greatly appreciated its delicate Adamesque interiors but even then at an early age realised that it had very little good furniture.