Addison

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Addison,

village (1990 pop. 32,058), Du Page co., NE Ill.; inc. 1884. An industrial suburb of Chicago, it manufactures machinery and plastic items.

Addison

Joseph. 1672--1719, English essayist and poet who, with Richard Steele, founded The Spectator (1711--14) and contributed most of its essays, including the de Coverley Papers
References in classic literature ?
It was while Addison was in Ireland that Richard Steele started a paper called the Tatler.
Yet, says Steele, long after, speaking of himself and Addison, "There never was a more strict friendship than between those gentlemen, nor had they ever any difference but what proceeded from their different way of pursuing the same thing.
The Tatler, especially after Addison joined with Steele in producing it, was a great success.
Sir John gave very good reasons, says Addison, but as they are somewhat long "I pass over them in silence.
But meanwhile the Whigs fell from power and Addison lost his Government post.
As Addison had now no Government post, it left him all the more time for writing, and his essays in the Spectator are what we chiefly remember him by.
In order to give interest to the paper, instead of dating the articles from various coffee-houses, as had been done in the Tatler, Addison and Steele between them imagined a club.
This on- looker, there can be little doubt, was meant to be a picture of Addison himself.
As he there gives us a clear picture of England in the time of Edward III, so Addison gives us a clear picture of England in the time of Anne.
But in the days when Joseph Addison and Richard Steele wrote the Spectator, there were no novels.
It was after the Spectator ceased that Addison published his tragedy called Cato.
With Cato Addison reached the highest point of his fame as an author in his own day, but now we remember him much more as a writer of delightful essays, and as the creator or at least the perfecter of Sir Roger, for to Steele is due the first invention of the worthy knight.