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combination, in business


in business: see trusttrust,
in law, arrangement whereby property legally owned by one person is administered for the benefit of another. Three parties are ordinarily needed for the relation to arise: the settlor, who bequeaths or deeds the property for another's benefit; the trustee, in whose hands
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(in Russian, kombinatsiia). (1) An interdependent union, connection, or arrangement of several objects or component parts (elements) of a single object.

(2) A set of procedures for carrying out a complex plan, such as a chess combination.

(3) A contrivance, trick, or subterfuge; a deliberate maneuver to achieve a mercenary or other improper goal (commercial combination; political combination).

(4) An item of women’s underclothing (a slip).



in mathematics. Combinations of n elements taken k at a time are sets that contain k of the n elements and that differ from each other in at least one element. The number of combinations of n elements, k at a time, is denoted by Combination, C (n, k), or Combination and is equal to n!/k!(n - k)! (seeCOMBINATORICS).


A selection of one or more of the elements of a given set without regard to order.


a. the set of numbers that opens a combination lock
b. the mechanism of this type of lock
2. Brit a motorcycle with a sidecar attached
3. Maths
a. an arrangement of the numbers, terms, etc., of a set into specified groups without regard to order in the group
b. a group formed in this way. The number of combinations of n objects taken r at a time is n!/[(n -- r)!r!]. Symbol: nCr
4. the chemical reaction of two or more compounds, usually to form one other compound
5. Chess a tactical manoeuvre involving a sequence of moves and more than one piece


A set containing a certain number of objects selected from another set.

The number of combinations of r objects chosen from a set of n is

n C r = n! / ((n-r)! r!)

where "n C r" is normally with n and r as subscripts or as n above r in parentheses.

See also permutation.


In the theory of combinators, a combination denotes an expression in which function application is the only operation.