Adelard of Bath


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Adelard of Bath

(ăd`əlärd), fl. 12th cent., English scholastic philosopher, celebrated for his study of Arabic learning. He translated Euclid from Arabic into Latin. His major works were Perdifficiles quaestiones naturales, which embodied his scientific studies, and De eodem et diverso, his principal philosophical work, which attempts a solution to the problems of nominalismnominalism,
in philosophy, a theory of the relation between universals and particulars. Nominalism gained its name in the Middle Ages, when it was contrasted with realism.
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 and realismrealism,
in philosophy. 1 In medieval philosophy realism represented a position taken on the problem of universals. There were two schools of realism. Extreme realism, represented by William of Champeaux, held that universals exist independently of both the human mind and
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) A forthcoming study by Max Lejbowicz argues that Bertrada is the queen before whom Adelard of Bath reports that he played the cithara, very likely at Tours, soon after Philips death on 29/30 July 1108.
While Abelard himself informs us in detail about his career, our knowledge of Adelard of Bath derives largely from a few scattered comments in his writing.
Middle Ages it is used (by Adelard of Bath, for example) to refer to
This intellectual compromise between theology and a scientific interest in the natural world was disseminated in Medieval Europe, he points out, by liberal European scholars such Adelard of Bath who wrote, "Of course God rules the universe.
Third is Averroes (Abu al-Walid Ibn Rushd, born in Cordoba, 1126-1198) who extended Aristotle's work on logic, and argued persuasively to liberal Europeans like Adelard of Bath that there is no conflict between philosophy and religion; he made innovative contributions to medicine, celestial mechanics and psychology.
Concentrating on five authors: Hildebert of Lavardin, Adelard of Bath, Bernardus Silvestris, Lawrence of Durham and Alan of Lille, Balint explores the variety of topics for which prosimetria was adopted.
Adelard of Bath, Conversations with His Nephew: On the Same and the Different, Questions on Natural Science and On Birds, Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Adelard of Bath, for example, who studied at Chartres before returning to England (where he taught the future Henry II), translated the works of Arab mathematicians into Latin.
Adelard of Bath, one of the earliest communicators of Islamic science to the West, who translated astronomical works from the Arabic into Latin in Sicily in the twelfth century, characterized the lesson of the Arabs, what he called "Sarracenorum sententiae" or "Arabum studia," as relying on rational arguments, with which he unfavorably contrasted his Western colleagues' slavish submission to authority (82, 90).
Let us hope that the collaboration of Keiji Yamamoto and Charles Burnett, which, along with the further collaboration of Michio Yano, has also brought us the edition of Abu Ma'sar's The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, together with the Medieval Latin translation of Adelard of Bath (Leiden, 1994), will continue in the future.
One of Abu Ma shar's minor works is The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, which is an abridgement of his Great Introduction for the convenience of the reader, and which was influential through the Latin translation made by Adelard of Bath in the twelfth century.
Its forty-eight page index provides a thorough and convenient guide, allowing one instantly to locate discussions of Adelard of Bath or Zeno of Citium.