Adowa


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Adowa,

Ethiopia: see AdwaAdwa
, Aduwa,
or Adowa
, Ital. Adua, town (1994 pop. 24,519), Tigray region, N Ethiopia. Lying on the highway between Aksum and Adigrat, Adwa is an agricultural trade center. Adwa was the most important commercial center of Tigray in the 19th cent.
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Aduwa

, Adowa
a town in N Ethiopia: Emperor Menelik II defeated the Italians here in 1896. Pop.: 17 476 (1989 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
1) The adowa is a local rhythm that has several different meanings that can be used in the musical and theatrical concept.
Adowa, so named for the first Italian-Ethiopian War that secured Ethiopian sovereignty on March 1, 1896, represents a broad swathe of the Caribbean archipelago with Radss Desiree (Dominica) on bass; Adoni Xavier (Trinidad) guitar, vocals; John Hewitt (Barbados) keyboards, vocals and Cornel Marshall (Jamaica) drums, vocals.
Ethiopian forces, however, independently joined the battle of Adowa and successfully defeated Italian forces, thus installing Ethiopia as a "local superpower" within Africa.
Having had already experienced a bitter colonial defeat at Dogali in 1887, the battle of Adowa in March 1896 proved to be the most humiliating and enduring for the Italian military.
Her defeat by the Ethiopians at Adowa in 1896 further weakened Italy's prestige and limited her expansion to Libya and the Horn of Africa.
In April 1896, after the Italian reverse at Adowa and French and British setbacks in the Sudan, Pressense wrote, "Africa is definitely taking its revenge upon Europe.
After their victory at the Battle of Adowa, the Abyssinians purchased additional weapons, both obsolete and modern.
I was learning the women's version of adowa, a funeral/ war dance, and wasn't finding the two-step and subtle hand gestures so exciting.
On March 1st, 1896 Ethiopia defeated Italy at the battle of Adowa, ending the latter's dream of a "Second Roman Empire".
Also in 1898 an Italian army was defeated at the battle of Adowa by an Ethiopian monarch mobilizing a Christian nationalism nurtured by long struggles against Muslim neighbors.
There are also a number of special features, such as "A Closer Look," which provide more detailed information about a particular subject or event, such as "Board Game from Ancient Sumer," "Royal Blood-letting," and "An Ethiopian View of the Battle of Adowa.
The Italians were still smarting over their defeat at Adowa in 1896 by Abyssinian forces.