Postposition

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Postposition

 

a class of auxiliary words having the meaning of prepositions, but occurring postpositively, that is, after the words they govern. Postpositions are common in various languages, including the Finno-Ugric, Turkic, Mongolian, Caucasian, and Tunguso-Manchurian. Examples are seen in the Tatar tavlar arasïnda (“between the mountains”; arasïnda means “between”), the Chuvash shïv urla (“across the river”; urla means “across”), and the Hungarian a tábla mellett (“beside the board”; mellett means “beside”). Some postpositions may take a case ending, as can be seen by comparing the Zyrian pu vylyn (“on the tree”; locative case), pu vylyś (“away from the tree”; ablative case), and pu vylǝ (“onto the tree”; aditive case). In some instances, postpositions are also used as substantives and with an independent meaning, as in the Tatar ara (“space,” “interval”) and arasïnda (“between”) and the Udmurt vylyn (“on”) and vyl (“surface”).

References in periodicals archive ?
In both cases, it would not be the status of the relevant adpositions as syntactically free elements which accounts for their behavior, but a different syntactic or semantic property.
The second part of the prediction says that these languages lack a large contrastive set of relational adpositions or local cases.
2010, From a Spatial Adposition to a Grammatical Relations' Marker.
Non-finite and deverbal forms in the elative are attested with 3 declination types (indefinite, possessive and definite), an indication that both forms refer to entities, and are not mere relation-words such as adverbs and adpositions might be conceived to be, see tables 5-6 for specific data.
In the journalistic texts of the 1890s the adposition jarele refers to a law in 10 cases, emphasising the authoritative nature of the source.
The encoding of direction (place, goal, source, route) in systems of adpositions and local cases is not uniformly distributed over different locations (at, in, under), but can be shown to follow a hierarchical pattern.
The locative case of the adposition can also vary in the same way as in nouns--in the tree example, for instance, the static adessive 'on' case has the directional counterparts allative 'onto' and ablative 'off of', indicating motion onto vs.
However, languages differ regarding the way they encode the distinction between these three notions by spatial case affixes or adpositions.
Precise topological relations are not marked by adpositions but by relational nouns in possessive constructions, whereby the relational noun is possessed by the Ground object, e.
The information lexicalized in dispositional roots in Mayan languages is largely distinct from the topological information encoded elsewhere in adpositions and case markers.
In many languages what starts out as a serial verb grammaticalizes into either an applicative or an adposition (cf.
As a result, the Recipient is preceded by an oblique adposition in (44c).