Adrastus

(redirected from Adrastos)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Adrastus

(ədrăs`təs), in Greek legend, king of Argos. He organized the ill-fated Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
..... Click the link for more information.
 expedition and was the only survivor. Ten years later he successfully assisted the sons of the Seven, the EpigoniEpigoni
, in Greek legend, the sons of the Seven against Thebes, who avenged the death of their fathers. Under the leadership of Adrastus and Alcmaeon, the Epigoni conquered Thebes 10 years after the Seven had fought alongside Polynices for the throne of Thebes.
..... Click the link for more information.
, in their attack on Thebes.

Adrastus

courageous Indian prince; Rinaldo’s enemy. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
See: Bravery

Adrastus

leader of the Seven against Thebes. [Gk. Myth.: Iliad]
References in periodicals archive ?
He draws attention to the contrasting and gendered attitudes toward violence displayed by the boys and their grandmothers in the second kommos, to the surprise appearance of Athena and its possible interpretations, and to the literary and historical context for the oath of alliance that she enjoins Adrastos to swear.
Es la etica pragmatista la que ha gobernado los designios de Teseo, como aquellos de Adrasto y tambien los de Creonte.
9) The dead Seven themselves are treated retrospectively as young men, whose actions are traceable to their immaturity Adrastos attempts to transfer the blame for his errors to a group of young followers (160); and these neoi would naturally include the two sons-in-law for whose sake he had mounted the expedition ([Characters Omitted], 132).
Adrastos urges the benefits of mutual contemplation, through which the poor may be spurred to industry and the rich learn caution from the fragility of good fortune.
Although Theseus and Adrastos raise several topics marginally associated with hubris, the word itself does not appear until the first of Theseus' political excursuses (231-37).
22) The inconsequence with which Theseus passes from the sins of the young men to class conflict complicates the view of Adrastos and justifies some speculation about contemporary political correlatives to his case.
48) Irrational pride, hasty reactions, and a concomitant fear of mockery and shame would seem to be just the qualities that might send a man or a nation into ill-planned aggressive activity; and Aithra's praise of a rash Athens contrasts very much with the intellectualism of her son, who rebuked Adrastos for neglecting euboulia (161).
The correlation of democratic politics and imperialism, patent in the history of the fifth century, is blocked to some extent in Theseus' own case by his rebuke of Adrastos and by his conservative political stance, while the positive defense of imperialist politics is assigned to an old woman, who expresses doubt about her right to self-assertion.
Young men are a locus of political and military hubris; and the tyrant's actions against them may seem almost justified, since even Adrastos, himself nominally a turannos, was overmastered by the uproar of his youthful followers.
70) There is also a striking parallelism between what Theseus does and what Adrastos did, in attempting to make good the "just" claims of Polyneikes (152-54).
Adrastos appeared in the first scene as a foil to Theseus; but he was reduced to silence in the scene with the herald, when his attempt to intervene was sternly repressed by Theseus (513).
Yet this speech thrusts us into another world, a private and personal one, that has been little seen in the earlier events (and this, of course, is another effect of Theseus' demand that Adrastos avoid traditional military themes).