astringent

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Related to Adstringens: astringent

astringent

(əstrĭn`jənt), substance that shrinks body tissues. Astringent medicines cause shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and are often used internally to check discharge of serum or mucous secretions in sore throat, hemorrhage, diarrhea, or peptic ulcer. Externally applied astringents, which cause mild coagulation of skin proteins, dry, harden, and protect the skin. Mildly astringent solutions are used in the relief of such minor skin irritations as those resulting from superficial cuts, allergies, insect bites, or athlete's foot. Astringent preparations include silver nitrate, zinc oxide, calamine lotion, tincture of benzoin, and vegetable substances such as tannic and gallic acids, catechu, and oak bark. Some metal salts and acids have also been used as astringents.

astringent

[ə′strin·jənt]
(medicine)
A substance applied to produce local contraction of blood vessels, to shrink mucous membranes, or to check discharges such as serum or mucus.

astringent

a drug or medicine causing contraction of body tissues, checking blood flow, or restricting secretions of fluids
References in periodicals archive ?
Um quilograma de vagens de Stryphnodendron adstringens possibilitou a obtencao de 117 g de sementes com impurezas que, apos a limpeza, renderam 77 g de sementes beneficiadas, e um quilograma de vagens de Stryphnodendron polyphyllum possibilitou a obtencao de 229 g de sementes com impurezas que, apos a limpeza, renderam 153 g de sementes beneficiadas.
adstringens (Tabela 1), a porcentagem de plantulas anormais nao foi afetada por nenhum dos tratamentos testados e para S.
The acetone soluble fraction from bark extract of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.
Oligomers and polymers of prodelphinidins and procyanidins (proanthocyanidins, PAs) are frequent natural products that are contained in many medicinal plants, like Stryphnodendron adstringens (deMello et al.
Despite the fact that Amphipterygium adstringens (usually known as "cuachalalate") is used intensively in traditional medicine throughout Mexico, there are, to our knowledge, no previous studies concerning the actual therapeutic, anti-inflammatory properties of this species.