Aedicule


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Aedicule

A canopied niche flanked by colonnettes, intended as a shelter for a statue or a shrine; a door or window framed by columns or pilasters and crowned with a pediment.
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But several occasions exist in fourteenth-century Italian monumental art where an arcuated aedicule must be interpreted in a fully three-fold manner, as marking a tomb, an altar, and a throne simultaneously.
I have therefore focussed, in some detail, on the theoretical aspects treated in the book--the aedicule and its emanatory movement--and left comments on the author's temple categories, ornamental terminologies, and dating to architectural historians.
Commencing again with reflections in figural art, the second type of narratives from the dugento and trecento commonly set within or before an arched or domical aedicule comprises depictions of events taking place at an altar.
The primitive Greek Doric aedicule framing the Shepherds' Monument and the strange rustic spandrels on either side of the rough-hewn arch seem to be Stuart's earliest architectural work; this also seems to be the earliest use of a Greek-revival order in England, predating the Doric temple at Hagley designed by Smart in 1758.
Instead of columns they paint fluted stems with oddly shaped leaves and volutes, and instead of pediments arabesques, the same with candelabra and painted aedicules, on the pediments of which grow dainty flowers unrolling out of roots and topped without rhyme or reason, by figurines.
The static aedicules of Stansted are unnecessary in the single sweep of space.
Built of Portland stone and Cornish granite, the octagonal building is built in strict Doric style, decorated with flat, plain pilasters at the edges of the four wider sides as well as two round Doric pillars at the front of the entrance portico, and a Doric frieze of triglyphs - three-grooved tablets - and blank metopes, or spaces, between them under the cornice of the main building and its three aedicules.
Furness's lumbering banks might derive their details from Gothic aedicules, but in their sense of implied motion, of living mass and bulk, they had more in common with the Monitor than perhaps any architectural monument in history.
75m, based on the requirement of about 20 children sitting in a circle, set the size for a series of aedicules or houselets, the conceptual components of the building.
It is, in fact, a baroque palace and, as such, unique in England, for it was rebuilt by the Duke of Newcastle in the 1670s and the walls are encrusted with heavy rustication and Mannerist aedicules.