Aegina


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Aegina

or

Aíyina

(ā`yēnä), island (1991 pop. 12,430), 32 sq mi (83 sq km), off SE Greece, in the Saronic Gulf (or Gulf of Aegina), near Athens. Sponge fishing and farming (figs, almonds, grapes, olives, and pistachios) are the most important occupations. Tourism is also important. The chief town is Aegina on the northwest shore. Points of interest include the temple of Aphaia, where the Aeginetan Marbles (see AeginaAegina,
c.500–480 B.C., marble sculptures from the temple of Aphaia discovered in 1811 and erroneously restored by Thorvaldsen. They originally decorated the pediments of the temple and represent scenes from the Trojan War. They are now in the Glyptothek at Munich.
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, marble sculptures) were discovered in 1811.

The island, inhabited from late Neolithic times, was named for the mythological figure AeginaAegina
, in Greek mythology, river nymph, daughter of the river god Asopus. She was abducted by Zeus to the island Oenone, where she bore him a son, Aeacus. Aeacus later renamed the island in her honor.
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. Its culture was influenced by Minoan Crete. Conquered by Dorian Greeks, it grew rapidly as a commercial state and struck the first Greek coins. In 431 B.C. the Athenians, against whom Aegina sided in the Peloponnesian WarPeloponnesian War
, 431–404 B.C., decisive struggle in ancient Greece between Athens and Sparta. It ruined Athens, at least for a time. The rivalry between Athens' maritime domain and Sparta's land empire was of long standing. Athens under Pericles (from 445 B.C.
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, expelled the population of the island, and Aegina fell into insignificance. In the 12th cent. it served as a haven for pirates, and the Venetians, in suppressing the outlaws, conquered the island. Albanians settled there in the 16th cent. During the Greek War of Independence the town of Aegina was (1828–29) the capital of Greece.


Aegina

(ējī`nə), in Greek mythology, river nymph, daughter of the river god Asopus. She was abducted by Zeus to the island Oenone, where she bore him a son, AeacusAeacus
, in Greek mythology, son of Zeus and the nymph Aegina. He was the father of Peleus and Telamon. After a plague had nearly wiped out the inhabitants of his land, Zeus rewarded the pious Aeacus by changing a swarm of ants to men (known as Myrmidons).
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. Aeacus later renamed the island in her honor.

Aegina,

c.500–480 B.C., marble sculptures from the temple of Aphaia discovered in 1811 and erroneously restored by ThorvaldsenThorvaldsen or Thorwaldsen, Albert Bertel
, 1770–1844, Danish sculptor, b. Copenhagen. In 1797 he went to Rome, where he shared with Canova the leadership of the neoclassicists.
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. They originally decorated the pediments of the temple and represent scenes from the Trojan War. They are now in the Glyptothek at Munich.

Aegina

1. an island in the Aegean Sea, in the Saronic Gulf. Area: 85 sq. km (33 sq. miles)
2. a town on the coast of this island: a city-state of ancient Greece
3. Gulf of. another name for the Saronic Gulf
References in periodicals archive ?
We express our deepest sorrow for the tragic accident in the maritime area of Aegina," a statement from the Greek political party Syriza read.
This situation is beginning to change thanks to the publication of Middle Bronze Age sites with stratified material culture spanning the entirety of the period such as (but not limited to) the sites of Lerna in the Argolid, Pevkakia-Magula in Thessaly, Kolonna on the island of Aegina, Ayia Irini on the island of Kea, Phylakopi on the island of Melos, alongside large assemblages from Nichoria and Ayios Stephanos in the southern Peloponnese (Fig.
Second, the Greek rowers at Salamis also fought with the belief that their governments in Athens, Corinth, Aegina, Sparta and other states of the Panhellenic alliance were based on the consent of their citizenry.
Aristippus and Cleombrotus were said to be in Aegina (59c4).
Durrell was raised in India and lived in many different countries and both writers spent long periods on islands: Kazantzakis in Crete, Naxos, and Aegina and Durrell in Corfu, Cyprus, and Rhodes.
This relation was of course set up much earlier in the case of such cities as those [of] Corinth and Aegina whose limited and unproductive soil was from the first unable to carry any large population and whose favorable position for commerce made them very early centers for first a carrying and then an export trade.
Because of this demonstration, many believed that Ladas was runner of dromos, some of them could confuse him even with the sprinter Ladas of Aegina, the winner of 125th Olympics, but it was almost certainly the long-distance runner from Sparta (V.
1 we can see the 6th century BC Greek drachma from Aegina island with the geometrical proof of the equality [(a + b).
The article and the underlying research project benefitted greatly from the discussion, insights, and encouragement I had with and received from my fellow CETL grantees: Aegina Barnes, Emily Davidson, and Leslie Keiler; and especially Michael Cripps, Anamika Dasgupta, Elizabeth Meddeb, Fabiola Fernandez-Salek, Karin Wolf, Detlef Ronneburtger.
These are seen to be in accord with views expressed or implicit in other texts from the Hippocratic Corpus, as well as in Aristotle and to a large extent in the later medical tradition of antiquity, extending even to Paul of Aegina.
My priest told me to worship the relics of Saint Nectarios of Aegina in the Radu Voda Monastery in Bucharest.
However, Cardamatis (10) described the course of the epidemic on the island of Aegina, located -25 km from the mainland, and stated that hemorrhage in all organ systems was the most common complication and cause of death.