Aequi


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Aequi

 

an ancient Italian tribe, evidently of Osean descent. In the middle of the first millennium B.C. the Aequi settled in the Aniene Valley. From the early fifth century B.C., along with the Sabines, Volscians, and Hernicians, they waged a bitter struggle with the Romans, who finally subjugated the Aequi in 304 B.C.

References in periodicals archive ?
In 458 BC, Rome was under dire threat by a tribe called the Aequi.
De esta manera, se puede decir que el caracter persuasivo del precedente transforma el concepto de justicia, aproximandose al boni et aequi de la tradicion juridica romana, al exigirle al juez sujetarse a los principios rectores del sistema, con la flexibilidad que supone conservar su papel de interprete y creador de derecho.
This brings us to an ever living old Roman law saying that Ius ist ars boni et aequi--not only aequi and not only boni.
justitiam namque colimus et boni et aequi notitiam profitemus" [rendemos culto a justica e professamos o saber do bom e do equitativo]) nao exige do teorico mais desinteresse do que o estudo dos direitos subjetivos do individuo.
Asi, Ulpiano, citando a Celso, afirmaba que ius est ars boni et aequi (Digesto 1, 1, 1 pr.
Voir aussi Limpens, Kruithof et Meinertzhagen, supra note 6 au para 2-83; Zweigert et Kotz, supra note 6 aux pp 605-15; David Howarth, << The General Conditions of Unlawfulness >> dans Arthur S Hartkamp et al, dir, Towards a European Civil Code, 4e ed, Alphen aan den Rijn (Pays-Bas), Nijmegen (Pays-Bas); Kluwer Law International, Lars Aequi Libri, 2011, 845 aux pp 845-46; van Dam, supra note 6 aux pp 142-43.
Casos: Bolivia, Ecuador, Brasil y Mexico", en Chile Ars Boni Et Aequi ISSN: 0718-2457 ed: v.
for the Latins felt that, without the co-operation of Roman power; it would be difficult for them to either the constant pressure of the Volsci and Aequi from the mountains or the standing danger of a new Etruscan conquest.
The first case, dated to 431 BCE, involved the dictator Aulus Postumius Tubertus on campaign against the Aequi and Volsci.
Anthony Barrett (1996, 22) notes that in a similar passage where Tacitus describes Agrippina in the pejorative terms aequi impatiens, dominandi avida (Ann.
Commentaren op fundamentele herbezinning (= Prinsengrachtreeks 2004-1), Ars Aequi Libri, Nijmegen, 2004, pp.