crop dusting

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crop dusting

[′kräp ‚dəst·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Applying fungicides or insecticides in powder form to a crop; usually done from a low-flying aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two independent bioassay trials were conducted on April 9, 2013, at Parris Island MCRD in conjunction with an operational aerial application of the island, and were the result of a cooperative effort between the USAF aerial spray unit and personnel from USDA-ARS-CMAVE.
Caption: New findings suggest that current regulations governing aerial application of pesticides may not adequately protect pregnant women living near Costa Rican banana plantations.
The chemistry is why this material flies so well from an aerial application standpoint, and together with the efficiency of the Erickson Heli-Crane aerial deployment system, it is very cost effective," Maile said.
AG-NAV is a major supplier of aerial application control equipment and navigational products sold throughout the world.
The delay was most severe at OWC where broad-scale, aerial application was used compared to Sheldon where Phragmites was only spot treated.
for aerial application services for area customers, and entered into a conditional agreement to purchase certain assets of the business.
Epidemic transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Sacramento County, California, in 2005 prompted aerial application of pyrethrin, a mosquito adulticide, over a large urban area.
Residents have expressed concern about the aerial application of pesticides on these fields, especially during school hours when children are outside.
org) Mtgs: 2006--Dec 4-6, Orlando, FL Membership: 1,350 members of the aerial application industry Dues: $400+
Hawks, Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs: pesticide aerial application service (owner).
The groups are recommending aerial application of 1080, a poison long used on native predators in the US, to the outrage of environmentalists and animal rights activists.
Roundup labels in the United States warn against aerial application and require people and animals to stay out of sprayed areas for several hours.