Æthelbald

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Æthelbald

(ĕ`thəlbôld, ă`–), d. 757, king of Mercia (716–57), grandson of a brother of Penda. He spent years in exile before he became king. A strong ruler, by 731 he controlled all England S of the Humber River and led expeditions into Northumbria (740) and against the Welsh (743). He was murdered by his bodyguard.
References in periodicals archive ?
32) A passage at the end of this chapter, moreover, occurs almost verbatim in Boniface's letter to King AEthelbald of Mercia.
So too were King Aethelbald (716-57) and then King Offa (757-96), the most powerful Anglo-Saxon king before Alfred the Great of Wessex.
It is also striking, but almost certainly coincidental, that the earliest other Anglo-Saxon appearances of the biblical quotation that appears on the inscribed fragment are in the eighth-century prose life of the Mercian warrior saint, Guthlac, who, according to his biographer, invoked it twice--first to dispel the devils that tormented him in his Fenland hermitage, and again when he sought to console the exiled AEthelbald that he would (as indeed he did) attain the Mercian throne (Life of St Guthlac ch.
The bank is one of the best preserved stretches of Wat's Dyke, built by King Aethelbald to protect Mercia after serious Welsh raids in 705 and 709AD.
Unlike Martin, who was a reluctant soldier and already "monkish" by disposition (73), Guthlac had been a willing warrior, and he must undergo a total spiritual transformation to understand the value of a Christian life as monk, hermit, and advisor to King Aethelbald.
There are Beorhtwulf and Ecfrith, Aethelbald, Berhtwald and Ceolred.
I would like to introduce you to King Aethelbald, who reigned in Mercia for 40 years.
There's no doubt that Aethelbald was larger than your average king, a ruler who did not know (or care) where the boundaries of his kingdom lay.
Under Aethelbald even London became a Mercian city, and the king taxed the shipping to raise funds for Worcester Cathedral.
It is understood that Wat's was built by King Aethelbald to mark the north-west frontier of Mercia.
The book concludes with case histories of `incentives towards artistic production in early Christian England': St Wilfrid, whose episcopal aspirations acted as incentive; the Lindisfarne Gospels, St Cuthbert's coffin, and the Ruthwell Cross (oddly, given the lengthy discussion of word and image, considered without any mention of the Dream of the Rood), all expressions of cults; and St Guthlac, in whose case the incentive seems to lie with the aspirations of King AEthelbald, which led him to ostentatious patronage of the saint.
Heaven is divided into three areas, reached by a rainbow bridge; in the penitential pits are queens - Cuthburga and Wiala, tormented with spots and flames for their carnal sins - a certain count and King AEthelbald of Mercia.