Æthelflæd

(redirected from Aethelflaed)

Æthelflæd

(ĕ`thəlflĕd, ă`thĕlflăd) or

Ethelfleda

(–flē`də), d. 918, daughter of King Alfred the Great of Wessex and wife of Æthelred, ealdorman [alderman or earl] of Mercia. After her husband's death in 911, she ruled the semi-independent Mercia alone. Campaigning with her brother, Edward the ElderEdward the Elder,
d. 924, king of Wessex (899–924), son and successor of Alfred. He fought with his father against the Danes. At Alfred's death (899) Edward's succession was disputed by his cousin Æthelwold, who allied himself with the Danes of Northumbria and East
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, she helped to recover the Danish-held lands S of the Humber River. After her death Mercia became part of the kingdom of Wessex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although its exact location is not known (it was the same site as the current Stafford Castle), historians say it would have been wooden, and was built for the then ruler of the Mercians, warrior princess Lady AEthelflaed, the eldest daughter of the Anglo-Saxon king, Alfred the Great.
The exhibition features the work of two of Warwickshire's early historians John Rous and Sir William Dugdale, and looks at the myths and legends around Aethelflaed.
Celtic and Anglo-Saxon civilizations produced Queen Boudicca and Aethelflaed, the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, who died in battle.
It is thought the site was attacked and destroyed by Aethelflaed, the daughter of Alfred, the King of Mercia.
Aethelflaed, the daughter of Saxon's King Alfred, lived in the late 800s.
They appealed to Queen Aethelflaed, daughter of Alfred the Great, for permission to settle in the North West of England and were granted lands in Wirral.
The Edge of the Sword" is the story of a young woman named Aethelflaed (rhymes with appleglad) whose father betroths her to his ally in order to strengthen his hold over Mercia, a region of England.
Dark Age Warwick & the Warrior Queen includes a film from the 1906 Warwick Pageant, which was advertised as a Celebration of the Thousandth Anniversary of the Conquest of Mercia by Aethelflaed.
Within four years he had been succeeded by the indomitable Earldorman Aethelred, who secured an alliance with Alfred of Wessex by marrying the king's daughter, Aethelflaed.
Elizabeth Hawkins said: "I had never heard of Aethelflaed [for it was she] until your review of the book about her by Jane Wolfe.
He married his daughter Aethelflaed to a leading Mercian noble and the two led the defence of what remained of the kingdom.