Aetosauria

(redirected from Aetosaur)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Aetosauria

[ā¦et·ə′sȯr·ē·ə]
(paleontology)
A suborder of Triassic archosaurian quadrupedal reptiles in the order Thecodontia armored by rings of thick, bony plates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scattered postcranial remains recovered from a mudstone horizon at Burntcoat probably belong to a small aetosaur.
021) from Evangeline Beach closely resembles those of aetosaurs but is also similar to that of Revueltosaurus (Parker et al.
Previous field class participants have recovered numerous fossils in the field area, including two skulls of the crocodile-like phytosaur Redondasaurus, armor plates and postcrania from a new heavily armored aetosaur, remains of a large predatory rauisuchian, and several hip and limb bones of one of the earliest dinosaurs.
They say about 1,400 skeletal elements have been recovered, including two skulls and a plethora of bones of the crocodile-like phytosaur Redondasaurus and limb bones from a new form of a large, heavily armored aetosaur.
Spencer Lucas, curator at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History, said: "Brachychirotherium tracks are known from various localities around the world, and they are an almost perfect match to the arrangement of bones in the aetosaur foot.
The largest species of aetosaur grew up to 5 meters long, although the two new specimens, representing a species called Typothorax coccinarum, were smaller growing up to 2.
Reminiscent of giant armadillos, aetosaurs were widespread during Late Triassic times (230 - 200 million years ago).
Re-evaluation of "Typothorax" meadei, a Late Triassic aetosaur from the United States.
Though some dinosaurs, such as a theropod called Coelophysis (D), did live in the late Triassic, they did not rule the landscape, Existing non-dinos included large armored herbivores called aetosaurs (C and E), mammal-like reptiles known as dicynodonts (A), land-dwelling ancestors of today's crocodiles (B), salamander-like amphibians (G) and other aquatic predators (F and H).
Stretching along six miles of parkland (and extending as far as Utah), the huge formation contains remains dating back 220 million years, from crocodile-like phytosaurs to armored, plant-eating aetosaurs.
Also, the Madagascar record is so far lacking in fossils of aetosaurs -- small armored reptilian herbivores that were abundant beginning about 228 million years ago.