black

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Related to African American: African American Vernacular English

black

1. of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light
2. Chess Draughts
a. a black or dark-coloured piece or square
b. the player playing with such pieces
3. a black ball in snooker, etc
4. (in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
5. Archery a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points

Black

1
1. Sir James (Whyte). born 1924, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
2. Joseph. 1728--99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

Black

2
Sometimes derogatory a member of a dark-skinned race, esp someone of Negroid or Australoid origin

black

a term used to refer to a variety of non-white ethnic groups. Black is a preferred form, especially among ethnic groups of African origins, reflecting a pride and identity in being black. The use of the term is associated with the rise of black political activism in the US in the 1960s, and is reflected in the slogan ‘Black is Beautiful’. Other terms to describe black people, such as coloured, Negro or Negress, are now generally considered offensive.

In the UK (and elsewhere), however, there is controversy about the use of the term to describe ‘non-white’ persons of Asian origin. Many Asians object to the use of the word ‘black’ to describe them and argue that this usage confuses the identity of a large number of very different ethnic groups such as Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Indians, West Indians, Africans and so on. The counter argument is that ‘non-white’ persons in the UK can be subject to DISCRIMINATION and institutionalized RACISM whatever their ethnic or national origins. In this sense, groups of both African and Asian origin share, to a significant extent, a common experience. See also BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, NEGRITUDE.

black

[blak]
(chemistry)
Fine particles of impure carbon that are made by the incomplete burning of carbon compounds, such as natural gas, naphthas, acetylene, bones, ivory, and vegetables.
(communications)
(optics)
Quality of an object which uniformly absorbs large percentages of light of all visible wavelengths.

black

Western color for mourning. [Christian Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 357]
See: Death

black

symbol of sin and badness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
See: Evil
References in periodicals archive ?
Climbing Jacob's ladder: The enduring legacy of African American families.
Rooks focuses on three magazines published, edited, and written by African American women: Ringwood's Afro-American Journal of Fashion (1891-1894), Half-Century Magazine for the Colored Home and Homemaker (1916-1925), and Tan Confessions (1950-1952).
The second phase of Harlequin's double-barreled seduction of African American readers was the company's November 2005 purchase of BET Books, the publishing arm of Black Entertainment Television that includes the Arabesque, New Spirit and Sepia imprints.
Several research studies have suggested that the extent to which African American students employ motivational and cognitive processes in academic situations may relate to the manner in which Black students perceive their ethnicity (Franklin & Boyd-Franklin, 2000).
Richie, who heads the African American Studies department at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Contemporary Mental Health Issues Among African Americans
At the same time, whereas Brownsville's elites had supported federally funded housing during World War II and its aftermath, they responded to the rising African American and Puerto Rican populations with concerted campaigns for private middle income houses to offset the spread of public housing.
Since Cleveland's decline, as factory jobs have vanished and nothing has taken their place, low-income residents, and African Americans in particular, are questioning an approach that to them seems too immigrant-sensitive.
African American Christians often operated under the conviction that "God was acting in history to effect spiritual and material salvation of all peoples of African descent and that the divine One would use them to present true Christianity and civilization to a world of injustice.
Although "moments of inclusion" occur when African American parents are encouraged to participate in school activities such as parent/teacher conferences and athletic events, interaction with African American parents often does not occur outside of these traditional invitations.
He hoped that an African American history commemoration would help build an educational foundation for the work of racial justice and restitution the nation so achingly required.

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