African Liberation Day


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African Liberation Day

May 25
While other holidays seek to commemorate the events and achievements of the past, African Liberation Day focuses attention on a goal that has not yet been fully realized: the liberation of all African people. The observance of this day can be traced back to April 15, 1958, when the Conference of Independent African States was held in Accra, Ghana. Attendees declared April 15 African Freedom Day, and between 1958 and 1963 this observance was supported by leaders worldwide, including President John F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, and Senator Hubert Humphrey in the United States.
As British and European colonies in Africa continued to win their independence during the 1950s and 60s, and as the civil rights movement in the United States began to achieve some success, 31 independent African countries met on May 25, 1963, to form the Organization of African Unity. They changed the name and the date of what now became African Liberation Day. In 1999 the group reorganized into the African Union.
Today, observances worldwide include marches, parades, rallies, and conferences. These events focus on celebrating freedom from colonialism, educating people about the progress of the African liberation movement, and speaking out against oppression. There are also sporting contests and tribal dances, particularly in Chad, Zambia, and other African states where it is a public holiday.
CONTACTS:
African Union
P.O. Box 3243
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
251-1-151-7700; fax: 251-1-151-7844
www.africa-union.org/root/au/index/index.ht
SOURCES:
AfrAmerHol-1991, p. 43
References in periodicals archive ?
African Liberation Day is increasingly being forgotten.
With the current African narrative changing the global view of the continent, the time to use African Liberation Day or even the month of May to promote pan-Africanism for unity and renaissance, couldn't be more opportune.
In the book, Fuller also tells the story of an historical event he organized in 1972, called African Liberation Day, which drew an estimated 30,000 black people to the nation's Capital to support liberation movements in Africa.
Almost half a century after the African Liberation Day was first celebrated, many Africans are still not at peace in their own countries.
Participants at the first meeting decided that their support for the African struggle would be organized around mass demonstrations to be held on African Liberation Day in the month of May.
Section two of the book provides detailed accounts of the organization, operation and impact of 1972's Gary Convention, African Liberation Day, and the evolution of the National Black Political Assembly.
The Journal of Pan African Studies joins the Pan African world community in paying tribute to the life and work of the late Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem who joined the ancestors on African Liberation Day (2009).
In this context, Burke's photograph of a sea of people at African Liberation Day in Handsworth Park in 1979 registers primarily as a woolly hat-fest, but while it is refreshing to see an exhibition which does not define black history primarily in terms of political struggle or social unrest, the political can never be entirely separated from the personal.
This year's African Liberation Day (25th May), the 43rd in the series, was observed in a big way throughout the African Diaspora -- from Belfast in Northern Ireland to Aalborg in Denmark, and all over America.