Cape Hunting Dog

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Cape Hunting Dog

 

(Lycaon pictus), a predatory mammal of the canine family, light in body; it has long legs, four toes on each foot, a large head, large and long ears, and a bushy tail. Body length, 1 m; tail length, up to 40 cm; height at shoulders, up to 75 cm; weight, up to 25 kg. The body is covered with short, sparse hair, and coloring is motley, with spots of white, black, and red shades forming very varied patterns. Cape hunting dogs inhabit the plains and savannas of Africa south of the Sahara. They hunt in packs of up to 20 or 30 and prey upon ungulates, following them rapidly and tirelessly. They destroy large numbers of such animals as antelopes and sheep. Ranging widely in search of prey, they hunt both in the daytime and at night. They have a loud bark. The female has litters of six to eight pups (in deep underground dens).

References in periodicals archive ?
Al Ain: Al Ain Zoo has announced the opening of a new exhibit dedicated to the African wild dog (lycaon pictus), a critically endangered carnivore from Africa.
He added that Mkomazi is prepared to be the breeding facility for African Black Rhino and African Wild dog in the country.
2001) found a smaller number of alleles and lower heterozygosity in African wild dogs in captivity, compared with those of wildlife.
Because of its unique genetic make-up, the African wild dog is unable to crossbreed with any other canine species.
He finally ends up in Tanzania on the trail of one of the most ancient canines on the planet, the African wild dog.
In 1995 the Roodes built an advanced veterinary facility and took on captive breeding of endangered species such as the African wild dog, black-footed cat, blue crane and ground hornbill.
177,500 to support scholarships and educational programs focused on protecting the African wild dog, the elephant and the snow leopard (conducted by Wildlife Conservation Network).
SIX African wild dog pups successfully bred at Al Ain Wildlife Park & Resort (AWPR) are now ready to leave the den where they have been cared for by their mother since their birth in November 2010.
The 50th anniversary of WWF is also marked with pictures of animals including an African wild dog.
As a consequence, the African Wild Dog now finds itself on the endangered list and the risk of rabies to humans is high.
The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) is a highly endangered carnivore found in Africa south of the Sahara.
Traveling around the world, the authors look at such cliffhangers as the African wild dog, the Barton Springs salamander and the Mediterranean monk seal.
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